Diabetes guidelines the national board of health and

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diabetes guidelines, the National Board of Health and Welfare (2015) conduct evaluations at the community level to determine if these guidelines are being properly applied and what they can do to improve these guidelines for the future. Although Sweden has sufficient national guideline in place regarding diabetes, there some improvements to be made. The national guidelines for diabetes are a focus for the government and other stake holders to help the population manage and prevent diabetes. There are no public guidelines in place available for the at-risk population. In addition to targeting the government to enact these guidelines, there needs to be something at the population level to help better prevent diabetes and promote healthier lifestyles for those living with diabetes. For example, education provided at schools on nutrition and how to make healthy food choices. Unlike obesity, there are clear and concise guidelines in place for diabetes, which when adapted to the population help promote health and prevent diabetes. Sexually transmitted infections (STI)
10 THE SWEDISH HEALTHCARE SYSTEM The final issue in Sweden to touch upon in sexually transmitted infections (STI). It is important to touch upon infectious disease to give a full picture of the Swedish healthcare issues, as diabetes and obesity are more chronic issues. According to Holtz (2017), sex education is a very high priority in Sweden. The idea of sex in Sweden would be considered liberal by many sources. They provide free screenings for sexually transmitted infections. In 2017, Sweden ranked in the top four countries of Europe with the highest number of chlamydia infections (European Centre for Disease Prevention, 2019). Unlike chronic illness mentioned above, STI’s are non-specific to social and economic class but are more related to age. Adolescents and young adults are more likely to experience an STI compared to older adults and the elderly (Edgardh, 2012). STI’s although treatable can lead to chronic disease such as cancer and infertility. Sweden has comprehensive healthcare for the whole population. Meaning they provide healthcare to all citizens through the government. So, in regard to STI’s, free screening is provided to the population of Sweden. Many STI’s do not show symptoms, so many people in Sweden will seek screenings if they suspect an STI is possible. Landes (2013), states that the Swedish law requires all individuals with a positive STI test, are mandated to report it to all their sexual partners so they can properly seek screenings and medical attention. Since these screenings are free more of the population are likely to seek care. Current stakeholders in regard in regard to STI’s, involve government officials and again healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are the ones providing the screenings to these individuals as well as treating them when a positive test occurs. Healthcare professionals are the ones providing education regarding safe sex and how to prevent these STI’s.

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