The legalist doctrine was formulated and made famous

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Feizi and Li Si during the late Warring States era.1.3Bureaucratic Empire: The Qin­Han DynastiesThe Qin DynastyDuring the Warring States period, each of the states vied for supremacy over allthe others, desiring to consolidate them into a single political entity. In 221 BCE,much of what we recognize as China today was finally unified by Ying Zheng,king of Qin (pronounced "chin"). Ying Zheng was quite simply the better fighteron the battlefield, the better politician in the capitals, and the better strategist.Positioned at the far northwest corner of all the Chinese states, he enjoyed thestrategic advantage of not being surrounded by enemy states as well as beingable to employ military techniques and technology learned from the steppes.Ying also employed effective divide and conquer techniques, likened to asilkworm eating a mulberry leaf bite­by­bite, to defeat his adversaries.After conquering the other warring states, Ying declared himself the FirstEmperor of All Under Heaven, or Qin Shihuangdi, the name that comes down tous through history. He organized his new empire along Legalist lines, notConfucianism, which was native to regions farther east, and began a series ofreforms that solidified much of what we now know as Chinese culture.
Qin ShihuangdiSource:Wikimedia Commons. In the public domain. Retrieved fromThe word China itself emerged during the Qin dynasty as Latin for the "land ofthe Qin." The reunification of China after the long decline on the Zhou restoredtrade over the Silk Road. This contact reached as far west as the Roman Empire,which gave China the name that is still used today across the globe. TheChinese name, Zhongguo, has been commonly translated as the "MiddleKingdom"; however, this interpretation has come into question as morecontemporary linguists have suggested that the traditional meaning of the wordwas "the states in center." While the former underscores the idea of Chinesecivilization being the center of the universe, the latter interpretation refers more tothe geographic location of the multiple states that make up Chinese civilization inrelation to the steppes, ocean, the mountains, and non­Chinese groups thatsurrounded them.Qin's reforms were widespread and transformative, forging the multiple sovereignChinese states together into a single, unified Chinese empire. For example, hecodified laws, standardized weights and measures, simplified Chinese charactersin a single writing system, gave his empire a common currency, and senthundreds of thousands of soldiers and peasants to work on great public worksprojects. Among these included the city walls surrounding his capital inChang'an, an imperial highway system, and a series of defense walls on thenorthern frontier which have been commonly associated (inaccurately accordingto some arguments) with the Great Wall of China.
One of Qin's most famous projects involved his preparation for the afterlife.

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