province from 1999 to 2002 and governor then party secretary of neighbouring

Province from 1999 to 2002 and governor then party

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province from 1999 to 2002, and governor, then party secretary of neighbouring Zhejiang province from 2002 to 2007. Following the dismissal of Chen Liangyu , Xi was transferred to Shanghai as party secretary for a brief period in 2007. He joined the Politburo Standing Committee and central secretariat in October 2007, spending the next five years as Hu Jintao 's presumed successor. Xi was vice president from 2008 to 2013 and vice chairman of the Central Military Commission from 2010 to 2012. ROC: Chiang Kai-shek Chiang Kai-shek ( /ˈtʃæŋ kaɪˈʃɛk, dʒiˈɑːŋ/ ; [2] 31 October 1887 – 5 April 1975), also known as Generalissimo Chiang or Chiang Chungcheng and romanized as Chiang Chieh-shih or Jiang Jieshi, was a politician and military leader who served as the leader of the Republic of China between 1928 and 1975, first
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in mainland China until 1949 and then in exile in Taiwan . He was recognized by much of the world as the head of the legitimate government of China until the late 1960s and early 1970s. Chiang was an influential member of the Kuomintang (KMT), the Chinese Nationalist Party, as well as a close ally of Sun Yat-sen 's. Chiang became the Commandant of the Kuomintang's Whampoa Military Academy and took Sun's place as leader of the KMT following the Canton Coup in early 1926. Having neutralized the party's left wing , Chiang then led Sun's long-postponed Northern Expedition , conquering or reaching accommodations with China's many warlords . [3] From 1928 to 1948, Chiang served as chairman of the National Government of the Republic of China (ROC). Chiang was socially conservative , promoting traditional Chinese culture in the New Life Movement . Unable to maintain Sun's good relations with the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), Chiang purged them in a massacre at Shanghai and repressed uprisings at Kwangtung ( "Canton" region ) and elsewhere. Chiang Ching-kuo Chiang Ching-kuo ( Chinese : 蔣經國 , Ningbo dialect : [tɕiã.tɕiŋ.koʔ] ) (27 April [nb 1] 1910 – 13 January 1988) was a politician in Taiwan . Son of Chiang Kai-shek , he held numerous posts in the government of the Republic of China . He succeeded his father to serve as Premier of the Republic of China between 1972–78 and was the President of the Republic of China from 1978 until his death in 1988. Under his tenure, the government of the Republic of China, while authoritarian , became more open and tolerant of political dissent . Towards the end of his life, Chiang relaxed government controls on the media and speech and allowed Taiwanese Han into positions of power, including his successor Lee Teng-hui .
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Lee Teng-hui- Lee Teng-hui ( Chinese : 李登輝 , Mandarin pronunciation: [lì t ŋ.xuuéi u] ə ə ; born 15 January 1923) is a Taiwanese politician. He was the President of the Republic of China and Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT) from 1988 to 2000. He was the first president of the Republic of China to be born in Taiwan. During his presidency, Lee promoted the Taiwanese localization movement and led an ambitious foreign policy to gain allies around the world.
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  • Republic of China, People's Republic of China, Kuomintang, Chiang Kai-shek

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