In programs and features you can also identify the

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In Programs And Features, you can also identify the software version of the installed applications on your computer. During the uninstall process, you may be asked whether you want to keep certain data or configuration files. That’s up to you. If you plan to reinstall the same application later (for example, if you’re uninstalling to try to correct a problem rather than to get rid of the program entirely), you may want to save the configuration files. That’s a double-edged sword, though, because if you’re uninstalling to try to correct a problem, that problem could possibly be caused by one of those configuration files. If for some reason you can’t uninstall an application using the preferred clean method, you can remove it using a brute-force method that involves manually deleting the program’s files and folders and perhaps manually editing Windows registry to remove the references to it. This is known as an unclean uninstallation. An unclean uninstall isn’t a good idea because the potential is great for accidentally deleting a file that is essential to some other application or making a change to the Registry that results in other problems. However, sometimes unclean uninstallations happen by accident. For example, you may accidentally delete the folder containing an application, or you may abort the standard Uninstall utility accidentally, resulting in a half-removed, unusable application that won’t allow itself to be removed using the utility. If you need to perform an unclean uninstallation for some reason, here are the basic steps for doing it: 1. Make sure that the application isn’t running. If it has a background component, turn that off. 2. Delete the folder containing the program files. It’s probably in the C:\Program Files folder. If it’s a 32-bit application on a 64- 392
bit version of Windows, it may be in the C:\Program Files (x86) folder. 3. Delete the program’s icons or folders from the Start menu. To do so, open the Start menu, right-click the icon or folder, and choose Delete. 4. If you have enough information to know what to delete in the Registry, start the Registry Editor (click Start, type regedit , and press Enter) and make the needed changes. Always be sure to back up the Registry before you edit it! Drivers A driver , also known as a device driver , is a piece of software written to tell the operating system how to communicate with a specific piece of hardware. Without a driver, the piece of hardware will not function. Usually, the only time you think about drivers is when you install new hardware, such as a printer. Most of the time when you connect your new hardware device and turn it on, your OS will recognize it and begin the driver installation process for you. Sometimes your OS will have a built-in driver that it can use. If not, it will ask you to provide one.

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