ty steady state Id bet that session rating of perceived exertion and perhaps

Ty steady state id bet that session rating of

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ty steady state, I’d bet that session rating of perceived exertion and perhaps the enjoy- ment of training would be better compared to a group who performed 18 HIIT sessions. In that design, a group should also be includ - ed which performed 18 steady state sessions. Two other aspects of concurrent training that I’d like to see investigated are training status and individualization. Specifically, much of the concurrent training literature is on novice to intermediate lifters; but how much cardio causes the interference effect in well-trained lifters? In terms of individualization, I sus- pect that high responders don’t see the inter - ference effect to the same degree. So, select- ing individuals with a high, moderate, and low number of satellite cells per myofiber and running them through individual magni- tudes of resistance training volume, but the same magnitude of aerobic exercise, would be a good start to see if high responders are more resistant to the interference effect. APPLICATION AND TAKEAWAYS 1. This study showed that minimal resistance training, even in the presence of high amounts of aerobic exercise, can still cause modest strength and size gains. 2. Conceptually, the idea of micro-training may have some merit. Specifically, if you consistently perform aerobic and resistance training back to back, then try performing some lower body lifting in a very short session at another time to avoid the back-to-back scenario. 3. Overall, if you are performing cardio as a typical lifter, refer to Table 5 above as your cheat sheet for how to incorporate cardio and mostly erase the interference effect. The only caveat to Table 5 is that even though HIIT may be ideal from a mechanistic perspective, high amounts of it can be impractical, so including some steady state cardio may be more sustainable for some 78
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References 1. Kilen A, Bay J, Bejder J, Andersen AB, Bonne TC, Larsen PD, Carlsen A, Egelund J, Nybo L, Mackey AL, Olsen NV. Impact of low-volume concurrent strength training distribution on muscular adaptation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2020 Apr 4. 2. Borg GA. Psychophysical bases of perceived exertion . Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 1982. 3. Sporer BC, Wenger HA. Effects of aerobic exercise on strength performance following various periods of recovery . The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 2003 Nov 1;17(4):638-44. 4. Wilson JM, Marin PJ, Rhea MR, Wilson SM, Loenneke JP, Anderson JC. Concurrent training: a meta-analysis examining interference of aerobic and resistance exercises . The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 2012 Aug 1;26(8):2293-307. 5. Murach KA, Bagley JR. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy with concurrent exercise training: contrary evidence for an interference effect. Sports Medicine. 2016 Aug 1;46(8):1029-39. 6. Hickson RC. Interference of strength development by simultaneously training for strength and endurance. European journal of applied physiology and occupational physiology. 1980 Dec 1;45(2-3):255-63.
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