2 respondents were often deeply self conscious and

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2. Respondents were often deeply self-conscious and found it hard to see themselves as sexual beings that can “let go” sexually when their body is defecating/urinating. 3. Many respondents tried to hide the bags from their partners (or negotiated with their partners that it was to remain covered during sex). 4. For several partners, becoming caretakers (cleaning up burst bags, etc.) led to a redefined intimacy that was more about being a caregiver and less about being a lover. 5. Spouses and lovers who remain in the relationship following stoma surgery help reaffirm the patient’s adult status and their sexual desirability. 6. Most research participants, if they felt any level of comfort, felt most comfortable talking to and showing their stoma to children, whom they felt were less judgmental. 7. Taboos about fecal elimination complicate the establishment and maintenance of intimate relationships. Most surprising finding or observation and why: Around 1 in 1000 people in the developed world have a stoma (opening in the abdomen that is attached to a bag to collect urine and/or feces). This statistic was surprising because it is much higher than I anticipated, probably because while individuals struggle with having a stoma it is largely out of the public eye. It made me wonder how many of my Sexuality students (as I’ve taught thousands) have read this article and possibly felt a connection. Create a multiple-choice test question on this reading that captures the main points of the article (mark correct response): Which of the following is not an issue that patients with stoma are presented with post-surgery? a. Feeling that they are undesirable to their partner(s). b. Feelings of embarrassment. c. Feelings of self-consciousness about their appearance. d. Loss of libido. e. All of above are issues that stoma patients dealt with. (CORRECT) This article should/shouldn’t be included in the fifth edition of Sex Matters: The Sexuality and Society Reader for the following reason(s): This article should be included in the next edition of Sex Matters because it covers a topic that is often so stigmatized that it is avoided. This article takes a first look at how individuals (re)negotiate their stigmatized bodies in sexual situations and interact with their partners following stoma surgery. While the population was drawn from Australia, the concepts generated from the interviews appear to be widely applicable. If another article becomes available that uses a larger sample size, perhaps it could replace this one.
15 Appendix C: BOLDED PROMPTS YOU CAN CUT AND PASTE FOR YOUR REAs (YOU MUST READ INSTRUCTIONS IN APPENDIX A AND REVIEW SAMPLE IN APPENDIX B) REA #_______ Your name: Article number in Sex Matters : Article title: Author(s) of article: Topic of article: Type of article: Types of data in article: Main argument or main point of article (5 sentences max): List between 7-10 most important points, findings or sub-points of the article: Most surprising finding or observation and why:

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