Team Diversity Team diversity means including members from different races

Team diversity team diversity means including members

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Team Diversity Team diversity means including members from different races, ethnicities, genders, professional backgrounds, various specialties, and age. The team will be developing and working closely with the PAC that will need to resemble the diverse patient population being served within the healthcare organization. The Institute for Patient-and Family-Centered Care (IPFCC) (2018), recommends that teams be open to differences in viewpoints and backgrounds allowing for a welcoming environment for new team members. A diverse group is necessary to create a productive climate and positively impact patient and family centered care.
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ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP 11 Leadership Theories The shared leadership style would be used in developing the multidisciplinary team. Shared leadership is based on the model that distributes leadership responsibility and believes all team members hold different capabilities that are of value in producing jointly desired outcomes. The concepts of shared leadership are relationships, dialogues, partnerships, and understanding boundaries. In the development of a patient and family centered care initiative to implement a patient advisory council, application of shared leadership takes into account that the workforce is comprised of well-educated, highly professional, and dedicated employees (Sullivan, 2017). Shared leadership rejects the notion of a single nurse leader, as many individuals contribute to a team’s performance (Sullivan, 2017). In shared leadership, governing is considered dynamic and enables continuous organizational change. When perspective is shifted from leadership being a single-person activity to a collective process, all team members feel empowered in the change process from creation to implementation. Implementation of Strategy This health care system lacks patient and family participation on councils aimed at improving patient quality care. Engaging patients and family members is an essential strategy when developing patient care initiatives. Developing a patient advisory council to address the need for patient and family participation in developing quality improvement initiatives is imperative to making health better for all. According to the Health Research and Educational Trust (2013), the first step in developing a patient advisory council is to develop a clear vision of what the patient advisory council is meant to accomplish. Next, the team needs to determine improvement opportunities in the organization using objective data and set realistic improvement goals. Setting priorities, developing and executing viable plans constitute the third step in
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ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP 12 implementing change. The fourth step is to monitor progress through collected and shared data. Compiled data will need to be shared with staff, senior leadership, and the community to show progress or not. This is an important step as determining if the team’s efforts are producing the desired results. The final step is for the team to provide ongoing implementation support to the patient advisory council and staff. Following these five steps will help the team and the hospital embrace patient and family centered care.
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  • Spring '16
  • Nursing, Advisory council

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