TCS food must be cooled from 135ºF 57ºC to 41ºF 5ºC or lower within six hours

Tcs food must be cooled from 135ºf 57ºc to 41ºf

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• TCS food must be cooled from 135ºF (57ºC) to 41ºF (5ºC) or lower within six hours. • First, cool food from 135ºF to 70ºF (57ºC to 21ºC) within the first two hours. • Then cool it to 41ºF (5ºC) or lower in the next four hours. • If food has not cooled to 70ºF (21ºC) within two hours, it must be reheated and then cooled again Total time cannot exceed 6 hours Cooling food: • NEVER cool large amounts of hot food in a cooler. Most coolers are not designed to cool large amounts of hot food quickly. Also, placing hot food in a cooler may not move the food through the temperature danger zone quickly enough. • After dividing food into smaller containers, place them in a clean prep sink or large pot filled with ice water. Stir the food frequently to cool it faster and more evenly.
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• Blast chillers blast cold air across food at high speeds to remove heat. They are typically used to cool large amounts of food. • Ice paddles are plastic paddles that can be filled with ice or with water and then frozen. Food stirred with these paddles will cool quickly. Food cools even faster when placed in an ice-water bath and stirred with an ice paddle. • When cooling soups or stews you can add ice or cold water as an ingredient to cool it. To use this method, the recipe is made with less water than required. Cold water or ice is then added after cooking to cool the food and provide the remaining water. Reheating food: apply to all heating methods Can be reheated to any temp if it was cooked and cooled properly Must be reheated within two hours to internal temp of 165*f 74*C for 15 seconds Reheat commercially processed and packaged ready to eat food to an internal temp of at least 135*f CH 8 Symptoms are generally the same for most bacterial illness: vomiting/nausia, diarrhea, cramps, fever Bacillus cereus : spore-forming bacteria found in dirt, hence the association with rice and grain products. The bacteria can produce two different toxins, causing two different illnesses. Listeria monocytogenes: soil, water, and plants Lives in: cool, moist environments Illness: uncommon in healthy people, but high-risk populations are especially vulnerable—particularly pregnant women. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli: found in the intestines of cattle. It can contaminate meat during slaughtering. Eating only a small amount of shiga toxin- producing E. coli can make a person sick. Once eaten, it produces toxins in the intestines , which cause the illness. The bacteria are often in a person’s feces for weeks after symptoms have ended. Campylobacteriosis: Found in poultry, contaminated water, meats, stews\ gravies. Symptoms : Diarrhea, abdominal cramps. vomiting , fever, headaches. Prevention: Control times and temp, cook food to minimum internal temp, prevent cross contamination. Botulism: Anaerobic bacteria, it can grow in oxygen-poor environments such as in canned food, vacuum sealed food, and in some foods packed in oil. Can be fatal without medical treatment Salmonella spp: carried by farm animals. Eating only a small amount of these bacteria can make a person sick. How severe symptoms are depends on the health of the person and the
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amount of bacteria eaten. The bacteria are often in a person’s feces for weeks after symptoms
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  • Fall '19
  • Drinking water, Tap water

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