Educators or volunteers visit homes every week and advise family members on the

Educators or volunteers visit homes every week and

This preview shows page 15 - 18 out of 25 pages.

communicators advise the educators on the programs. Educators or volunteers visit homes every week and advise family members on the pedagogical activities featured in an activity guide for children that is consistent with the content presented in the radio or television programs. A playroom, community center, or other venue is used for weekly or biweekly group meetings of the children and their families to encourage socialization and relevant learning that may not be taking place in the home. At these meetings, an educator demonstrates to parents how to conduct the pedagogical activities. Specific examples— CHILE: Radio Kindergarten, Kindergarten to the Residence (JUNJI). MEXICO: Program for Distance Attention of the Children.
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Early Child Development: Lessons from Non-formal Programs PERU: Capulí, Expansion of the Coverage through the Communications Media. (NUCOL). VENEZUELA: The Teacher at Home. To complement these examples of non-formal ECD programs in Latin America and the Caribbean, several informative annexes are offered at the end of this chapter. They include a summary of the legal strategies used by twenty-one countries to create ECD services and programs (Annex 1) and some examples of ECD programs developed by Governments and the Civil society. (Annex 2). Conclusion Non formal ECD programs represent as alternative options to develop communities’ capacity to fight against poverty. Expanding ECD programs nationally or across Latin America or any other region or continent is a great challenge for everyone involved. ECD programs uniquely depend on a complex network of local, regional, and national institutions for financial, managerial, and implementation support. Typically, programs consist of thousands of micro projects, each of which provides services to fifteen to twenty children. These micro units depend on the participation and contributions of volunteers, parents, and community workers. Groups of ten to twenty micro projects form neighborhood clusters that depend on parent associations for organizational support, which, in turn, depend on a network that includes NGOs and other components of the civil society. These networks depend on city-wide support to procure and distribute food, train caregivers, conduct public information campaigns, and monitor and evaluate programs. Comprehensive, integrated networks that combine the support of local, regional, and national institutions offer the greatest promise for taking effective ECD programs to scale. The civil society clearly has an important role to play in early child development. It is a component of the comprehensive networks needed to support and sustain ECD programs in specific communities and an integral part of the combined efforts of local, regional, and national institutions.
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Early Child Development: Lessons from Non-formal Programs R EFERENCES Barros, R.P. de, and R. Mendonça. 1999. Costs and Benefits of Pre-school Education in Brazil .
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