Each band strived for a recognize sound either

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-Each band strived for a recognize sound, either associated with the leader/soloist such as Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Tommy Dorsey, or an arranging technique such as the Glenn Miller Band's clarinet-lead saxophone section sound.
-Every band had a recognizable theme song-The musicians were required to read music-Many swing band musicians were not improvisers, usually only a few members of these groups were "jazz" players-Improvisation was not an important part of many groups, but some popular Swing bands such as Count Basie, Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington made a point to emphasize improvisation in their groups.The Casa Loma Band: Led by Detroit musician Glen Gray, the Casa Loma Band was one of the first white groups to play with the "swing" feel associated with Count Basie, Fletcher Henderson bands. Started in 1929, this group led the way for other white swing bands to come, especially Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey. This group was popular with college crowds because of the clean, well-executed ensemble playing and well-arranged repertoire of popular tunes and some riff based blues tunes.Jimmie Lunceford: the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra (black band orchestra), well known to musicians early in the 30's, as this group was one of the most swinging bands anywhere. Jimmie Lunceford, like Duke Ellington, became famous after a long engagement at the Cotton Club, which included national radio broadcasts. Known for their precision and slick showmanship, this group played a "book" of imaginative arrangements, many written by Sy Oliver.As was often the case during the Swing Era, a white Swing Band (Tommy Dorsey Band) used a popular black band (the Lunceford band) as a model for their swing style. Tommy Dorsey hired arranger Sy Oliver from Jimmie Lunceford to write for this band (a move which paid handsomely for Dorsey)Benny Goodman Band: Born and raised in Chicago, Benny Goodman (1909-1986), was an excellent clarinetist and band leader, becoming known as the King of Swing. He formed his own band in 1934 and with help of producer John Hammond (the same man who discovered the Basie band in Kansas City), was hired for a national weekly radio broadcast called "Let's Dance" later that. "Let's Dance" was Goodman's theme song for the rest of his career, a tune that fans from across the country would recognize.In 1935 Goodman left the radio show and embarked on a summer tour heading toward the west coast. They met little success on the tour until arriving in Los Angeles, playing at the Palomar Ballroom. This engagement was hugely successful as the band played mostly Fletcher Henderson arrangements to packed audiences night after night. The change to the Henderson material (another instance of white band gaining commercial success by playing the music associated with a black band) combined with nightly national radio broadcasts and rave reviews in the print media turned the Goodman shows at the Plomar into a national sensation. These performances mark what many call the beginning of the Swing Era.

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