Students learned math science and other academic

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awful and tormenting towards the Native American culture, they were not all negative. “Students learned math, science, and other academic subjects. They also learned trades and practical skills, such as agriculture, carpentry, printing, and cooking, which were useful skills used later in life” (Nation Museum of the American Indian 2007). Ultimately it is obvious that both culture’s schools were similar in some ways but the literal education gained from individuals differed. Another similarity the Ju/Hoan Sans and the Native Americans share is their ways of looking up to a higher individual. Sans adore their elderly as higher figures and the Native Americans love the warriors. Both the elderly and the warriors provide for their
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6 culture in many ways. The elderly of the San’s become role models when they reach a respectable age. They have been involved in their culture for many years so they gain respect from their fellow San’s for their vast amount of contribution to society; therefore it is valued to grow old. They provide for a means of protection and knowledge to their culture so they are willing to help in many ways. Although the warriors age of the Native American culture are not old like the San’s they still provide for their people in similar ways. “Warriors were regarded with the utmost respect in their communities. Boys trained from an early age to develop the spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical strength they would need to become warriors. They cared for people and helped in many ways, in any time of difficulty. They would do anything to help their people survive, including laying down their own lives” (Nation Museum of the American Indian 2007). Initially one may believe that each and every culture has their own natural tendencies and ways of life that are different among any other. However that is not the case because many cultures share various characteristics amongst each other. Through cultural relativism one is able to “understand another culture in its own terms sympathetically enough so that the culture appears to be a coherent and meaningful design for living” (Shultz and Lavenda 2001: 28). Thus it is providing individuals with the opportunity to think about and make connections between their own culture and another. In conclusion, the history and culture of the Ju/Hoan is similar to the culture and history of Native American groups in North America.
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DeMatto 7 Works Cited Beake, Lesley. Kalahari Peoples Network . Kalahari Peoples Fund, July 2008. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. < ;. National Museum of the American Indian . Smithsonian, 2007. Web. 18 Feb. 2012. < ;. Schultz, Emily A., and Robert H. Lavenda. Cultural Anthropology A Perspective on the Human Condition . 8th ed. New York, New York: Oxford UP, 2001. Print.
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  • Spring '07
  • Sanabria
  • Cultural Anthropology, Native Americans in the United States, Kalahari Peoples Network

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