Involves the willingness to speak out and do what is

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 96 pages.

involves the willingness to speak out and do what is right in the face of forces that would lead us to act in some other way. Nurses who possess moral courage and advocate in the best interest of the patient may at times find themselves experiencing adverse outcomes. There is a need for all nurses in all roles across all settings to commit to working toward creating work environments that support moral courage." (ANA, 2015). Any field of health care charges nurses to makes tough health care decisions; the difference with superior nursing is how you practice behind closed doors, when no one is looking incorporating ethical and moral nursing into the nursing practice. That gut feeling you had explaining you felt it was "harsh" probably was your inner moral voice saying "STOP!" While being scared straight may be a tactic, I would be weary of practicing methods of nursing that were not evidence-based. How often do those methods successfully prevent patients from high-risk behaviors? Is it your personal opinion that this method is successful, or do you have evidence-based research to back up your scared-straight method? References
American Nurses Association. (2015). http :// Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 13, 2015 06:04 AM 0 Like Kim Kooser 15 posts Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Melissa, that is not what I am implying at all. As I mentioned before I agree with you that this was not the "preferred" method and not one I would have chosen. I used it as an example to show that the person needs to understand the severity of the situation. I understand ethics and ALWAYS try to put my patients right to privacy as paramount. This was not my patient and merely a scenario I was present for. I can appreciate your views and while I do share the same values. I fear I portrayed the scenario in a way that I appeared much more involved. Again, not my patient, not my decision, something I observed. Reply | Quote & Reply | Report Abuse Oct 13, 2015 09:38 AM 0 Like Substantive Post Melissa Marsh 6 posts Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Kim, I am well aware that you didn't have a part in the nurses decision to do what she did. My point is merely that as nurses it can be hard to take a stand in that scenario when others can practice in ways that aren't congruent with the ethical standards that nursing practice demands. My debate was only to point out that we can and should take a stand and advocate for patients even in hard scenarios, and should practice nursing with an evidence based approach, and in that scenario, maybe a better solution could have been made. I'm not criticizing you personally, only debating the methods the other nurse used. This is how we as nurses can make positive changes, by being able to professionally and objectively look at our practices and take our own beliefs and feelings out of the scenario. When we see this day in and day out, it can get old and as a nurse I can see how you and her would want to make a lasting impression. However, when we become passionate

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture