They will exacerbate rather than solve the supply

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create shortages, shortcuts on quality or overcharging in other areas that are equally necessary. They will exacerbate rather than solve the supply side problem. Encouraging transparency and competition, on the other hand, will bring down prices holistically while boosting India’s medical tourism sector, a potential job spinner. Not only is there a shortage of doctors in India, they rarely venture out of urban areas. This dimension influences India’s disproportionately high out-of-pocket expense on healthcare of more than 60%. The primary cause for this shortage is the disappointing performance of Medical Council of India which has exercised control over licensing of doctors and their ambit. Recognising this lacuna, government has introduced a bill to annul MCI, free up medical education from stifling controls and also introduce an exit exam at the undergraduate level. However, one supply side dimension which has been neglected is a pathway for experienced nurses to shoulder more responsibility for providing care. India needs to use its cadre of experienced nurses to offset supply-side shortages. Moreover, gaps in rural India can be made good only by government. The national health policy aims to gradually increase healthcare spending to 2.5% of GDP. Most of the additional spending needs to be directed to raising healthcare provision in rural areas as well as for underserved sections of the urban populace. Healthcare, like other areas, needs a lot more options arising from enhanced supply and competition. Key words: 1. National Health Protection Mission; 2. Medical Council of India Q3: Reformist changes in Saudi Arabia for creating gender equality will certainly have a broader trickle-down effect on many Muslim societies across the world. Comment. Women drivers Times of India | Social Justice In Saudi Arabia where women are, at best, treated effectively as legal minors and at worst, treated as servants, revoking the decades-old ban on women drivers is a historical turning point. The country, which punished dozens of its women who had defied the religious prohibition on women drivers by firing many of them from government jobs and by calling all of them ‘immoral’ from the pulpits of mosques, has come a long way. Though the move for invalidating the ban was announced in September 2017, the law came into effect recently. Saudi Arabia was the only country left in the world where women could not drive. This progressive step, which is one of the many that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been taking as part of his Vision 2030 programme to diversify the economy, will have an impact not just domestically but also on global Sunni Muslim societies. Ever since the discovery of oil and the subsequent establishment of a petro-dollar economy Saudi Arabia, as the birthplace of Islam, wields enormous religious influence on Sunni Muslim societies across the world. But Saudi Arabia practices and propagates Wahhabism , an extremely conservative school of Islam that ordains death penalty for adultery by beheading or stoning or crucifixion or firing. It also permits Saudi men to enter ‘temporary marriages’ which are synonymous with sexual slavery.
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