ENGL
Elsa Dealing with Depression.docx

This is especially true where elsa is treated like an

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to feel ashamed of their condition. This is especially true where Elsa is treated like an outcast for displaying her powers. So much that she feels the need to run away. She is taught to conceal. Not everyone who has a mental illness will have been taught this, but many can surely relate to the way in which Elsa’s family forces her to bury her feelings. Elsa’s parents do not offer support or guidance, instead she is taught to conceal everything, to bury her emotions, and is actually given gloves to help suppress her powers. “ Don’t let them in, don’t let them see, be the good girl you always have to be! Conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know” (Lopez, K & R, 2013). It is only when Elsa is away from her family and all those that surround her that she is able to express herself and let go of the chains that have bound her for many desperate years. Elsa’s gloves are “masking the problem.” Her gloves are a symbol for her dependence on antidepressants. She has been wearing gloves since she was a small child, primarily as a means of stopping the ice powers she has from affecting anyone else. Her parents use the phrase “Conceal, don’t feel,” like trying to prevent suicide by chanting “Fun, not gun.” With her being locked up in the palace forever, her gloves/antidepressants weren’t paired with anything useful, like positive social interaction. Prolonging treatment with antidepressants is bad, and Elsa lines right up with every ill effect of extended use. She has been using gloves since she was a small child, and now as a young woman she can’t function without them. Another
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ELSA DEALING WITH DEPRESSION 6 symbolism is the prolonged use of antidepressants can cause “involuntary tics,” such as the one’s Elsa experienced when she shot ice everywhere at her coronation. Elsa doesn’t know how to get better. One of the first major problems with someone who has depression is that they can’t explain what’s going on to anybody, and for Elsa, that begins as a child. She believes she can never let Anna know the truth about why she stays locked up. Despite Anna’s best attempts to get her sister out, what Anna didn’t know was that she was really doing about the best thing for someone who has depression, and that’s simply being there and being patient. She experiences an emotional breakdown. The minute Elsa realizes she is capable of freeing her emotions, she becomes stronger and more powerful than ever before. The dramatic nature of Elsa’s emotions results in a terrifying loss of control when she sees her sister again.
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  • Spring '14
  • AbbigailL.McKinney
  • Schizophrenia, Major depressive disorder, dysthymia, Princess Elsa

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