2 331 32 It is not enough for Hamlet to accomplish his goals to gain a full

2 331 32 it is not enough for hamlet to accomplish

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my story” (5. 2. 331-32). It is not enough for Hamlet to accomplish his goals; to gain a full sense of achievement, his labors must be recognized and renowned. A stereotype of men is that when they are wronged on a personal level, they feel a strong need to seek vengeance. As a part of their nature, men will usually stop at nothing until they uncover the buried truth. Pride in the form of one’s action or inaction contributes to the building of an invincible attitude. People who exhibit extreme narcissism in their abilities
Cristea tend to believe that their opinion is always right. Hamlet takes advantage of this because he wishes to prove himself and make it appear as if he has the confidence to avenge his father. In reality, Hamlet is not able to get past his grief and enact the revenge that is expected of him. Hamlet is described as sensitive and feminine, and he lets his emotions get in the way. Hamlet wants to be king but because he is not a fighter and aggressive, like is generally characteristic of a leader, he does not think he stands a chance. The play that Hamlet prepares to oust Claudius with further proves his gentle and non-combative nature. Instead of facing Claudius, man to man, Hamlet hopes that Claudius will unintentionally reveal his own guilt through his reactions when watching the play. With this approach, Hamlet is able to receive the glory he desires without getting his hands dirty. Had Hamlet taken heed to the caution given to him by his mother, he would have saved himself a lot of trouble and prevented consequent deaths. Gertrude may tell him, “Do not for ever with thy veiled lids/ Seek for thy noble father in the dust,” but Hamlet knows that if he ignores her counsel, he will seem assertive and unrelenting (1. 2. 70-71). In order to create a certain image for his people, Hamlet attempts to be someone he is not. If Hamlet knows that he must act swiftly and assertively, then why is he tentative in challenging Claudius for his father’s murder? One reason behind Hamlet’s façade may be that, after all is said and done, his actions appear to be meticulous, precise, and effective. He does not want to seem rash in his decision, which may cause the validity of his actions to be questioned. The truth behind Hamlet’s tentativeness is that he second-guesses his own motives and fears making a mistake. Whenever Hamlet finally acts, he does so impulsively and inappropriately. Thinking that it is Claudius behind the arras, Hamlet stabs and kills Polonius. At this point, Hamlet loses his innocence and essentially becomes a criminal himself.
Cristea Hamlet knows that his only chance at redemption is to quickly thrust the attention onto Claudius. Hamlet has prolonged his plan for revenge for too long. To get the reaction and praise he craves, Hamlet has to act before his actions are analyzed.

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