25 try to open a telnet session to your router from

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Chapter 10 / Exercise 8
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25. Try to open a Telnet session to your router from PC-A. Were you able to open the Telnet session? Explain. No, we told it to only allow ssh i. Open a PuTTY SSH session to the router from PC-A. Enter the user01 username and password user01pass in the PuTTY window to try connecting for a user who does not have privilege level of 15. Exercise Question 26. If you were able to login, what was the prompt? Yes, R1> j. Use the enable command to enter privilege EXEC mode and enter the enable secret password cisco12345 . Task 6: Configure an SCP server on R1. Now that SSH is configured on the router, configure the R1 router as a secure copy (SCP) server. Step 1: Use the AAA authentication and authorization defaults on R1. Set the AAA authentication and authorization defaults on R1 to use the local database for logins. Note : SCP requires the user to have privilege level 15 access. a. Enable AAA on the router. R1(config)# aaa new-model b. Use the aaa authentication command to use the local database as the default login authentication method. R1(config)# aaa authentication login default local c. Use the aaa authorization command to use the local database as the default command authorization. R1(config)# aaa authorization exec default local d. Enable SCP server on R1. R1(config)# ip scp server enable Note : AAA is covered in Chapter 3. Step 2: Copy the running config on R1 to flash. SCP server allows files to be copied to and from a router’s flash. In this step, you will create a copy of the running-config on R1 to flash. You will then use SCP to copy that file to R3. a. Save the running configuration on R1 to a file on flash called R1-Config. R1# copy running-config R1-Config © 2019 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public. Page 15 of 42
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Chapter 10 / Exercise 8
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Lab - Securing the Router for Administrative Access b. Verify that the new R1-Config file is on flash. R1# show flash -#- --length-- -----date/time------ path 1 75551300 Feb 16 2015 15:19:22 +00:00 c1900-universalk9-mz.SPA.154-3.M2.bin 2 1643 Feb 17 2015 23:30:58 +00:00 R1-Config 181047296 bytes available (75563008 bytes used) Step 3: Use SCP command on R3 to pull the configuration file from R1. a. Use SCP to copy the configuration file that you created in Step2a to R3. R3# copy scp: flash : Address or name of remote host []? 10.1.1.1 Source username [R3]? admin Source filename []? R1-Config Destination filename [R1-Config]? [ Enter] Password: cisco12345 ! 2007 bytes copied in 9.056 secs (222 bytes/sec) b. Verify that the file has been copied to R3’s flash. R3# show flash -#- --length-- -----date/time------ path 1 75551300 Feb 16 2015 15:21:38 +00:00 c1900-universalk9-mz.SPA.154-3.M2.bin 2 1338 Feb 16 2015 23:46:10 +00:00 pre_autosec.cfg 3 2007 Feb 17 2015 23:42:00 +00:00 R1-Config 181043200 bytes available (75567104 bytes used) c. Issue the more command to view the contents of the R1-Config file. R3# more R1-Config ! version 15.4 service timestamps debug datetime msec service timestamps log datetime msec no service password-encryption !

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