The sections of the book written in aramaic include

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The sections of the book written in Aramaic include the majority of Daniel’s memoirs (chaps. 2–3; 5–6), the proclamation relating Nebuchadnezzar’s account of his experience with Yaweh The Hebrew and Aramaic text of Daniel has been well preserved, and few of the textual variations are significant. 136 Although Jewish believers revered the book, interestingly there are no Targums on Daniel. 137 Of the versions, the Greek translations designated Theodotion and the Septuagint are by far the most important. The Septuagint (probably third century B.C. but no later than ca. 130 B.C.) is paraphrastic and omits certain passages that appear in the Hebrew Bible while
expanding the text in other instances. 138 Theodotion’s translation was considered by Origen to be superior to the Septuagint, more closely corresponding to the Hebrew text. Both Greek translations of Daniel are attested in the New Testament. Daniel 7:13 in the LXX seems to be reflected in Matt 24:30; 26:64; and Rev 14:14, whereas Theodotion’s rendering of Dan 6:22 is found in Heb 11:33. If this is the case, it contradicts the common date of A.D. 180 for Theodotion. 139 A. Schmitt, however, has observed that the Daniel of Theodotion is from a different hand from the rest of Theodotion, 140 and others have attempted to trace the Theodotion Daniel to the Scroll of the Minor Prophets from Naḥal Ḥever. [Miller, Stephen (2011). Daniel. B&H Publishing Group. Retrieved from .] PENTECOST is the greek name for the Old Testament Feast of Weeks (Exodus 34:22; Numbers 28:26; Deuteronomy 16:10). It is called the Feast of Harvest in Exodus 23:16. According to Leviticus 23:15-16, on the seventh Sabbath (seven weeks or 49 days) after Passover, the sons of Israel were to celebrate the harvest by bringing voluntary offerings to the Lord. [LaHaye, Tim & Hindson, Ed (2018). Popular Encyclopedia of Bible Prophecy (p. 267). Wordsearch. Retrieved from .] Some scholars have observed parallels between Jesus’ reception of the Spirit at His baptism and the gift of the Spirit to Jesus’ followers at Pentecost [LaHaye, Tim & Hindson, Ed (2018). Popular Encyclopedia of Bible Prophecy (p. 267). Wordsearch. Retrieved from .]
“It concerned a great war” has been variously interpreted. “War” is a translation of Hebrew sābā’, “army, war, warfare, or service.” [Miller, Stephen (2011). Daniel. B&H Publishing Group. Retrieved from .] it concerned a great conflict,” NRSV), and the KJV understands it to mean that the message was for the distant future, “the time appointed This understanding came as an answer to Daniel’s prayers (cf. 10:12). Evidently the prophet was again praying for wisdom concerning the future of his people, the Jews. In the previous three visions God had already revealed much pertaining to Israel’s fate, but Daniel desired to know more. His mourning involved prayer For three weeks Daniel had been fasting when he received the revelation —“I ate no choice food; no meat or wine touched my

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