It doesnt look across the entire image it only looks

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look. It doesn’t look across the entire image. It only looks within the distance we specify. That’s why the Radius value is measured in pixels (px). If we set the Radius value to, say, 50 pixels, Photoshop will look 50 pixels in either direction of our initial selection edge to determine if there’s anything else within this area that should be included in our selection. If we look in my document window, we can see the radius as that visible zone between the two areas of solid black. The solid black represents areas that Photoshop is ignoring as it looks for additional pixels to add to our selection (with the On White view mode, the areas being ignored appear in white, not black). Only pixels within the radius zone are being analyzed:
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The Radius appears between the areas of solid black. To make it easier to see, I’ll press the letter K on my keyboard to quickly jump from the On Layers view mode to the Black & White view mode, and now the radius zone appears as solid white between the black areas:
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I’ll switch back to the On Layers view mode by pressing the letter L on my keyboard. Smart Radius Increasing the Radius value has allowed me to fit more of the woman’s hair into the zone that Photoshop is analyzing, which is great, except that at the same time, it’s not so great because it’s causing potential problems in other areas. The radius is now too wide around the woman’s arm and shoulder, and it’s also appearing around the bottom and right edge of the image where I don’t need it at all: The hair needs a wide radius, but other areas do not. This is where the Smart Radius option comes in. You’ll find it directly above the main Radius slider. By default, Smart Radius is turned off. I’ll click inside its checkbox to turn it on: Turning on Smart Radius. With Smart Radius enabled, Photoshop looks more closely along the edge of the initial selection and tries to tighten up the radius size wherever possible. In other words, with my image, the edge along the woman’s arm and shoulder is smooth, so Photoshop will (hopefully, anyway) reduce the width of the radius in that area while still leaving a wider radius for the hair. If we look in my document window, we see that Photoshop has done exactly that. I still have a wide radius around the hair, but the radius along the arm and shoulder is much more narrow. There’s still a bit of unwanted radius along the bottom of the image, but we’ll see how to clean that up in a moment:
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With Smart Radius turned on, Photoshop can adjust the width of the radius in different areas. A quick note about Smart Radius before we continue. Depending on your image and the type of edge you’re working with, Smart Radius can help or it can make things worse. A general guideline with Smart Radius is that it tends to help with selections that contain different types of edges, as in my case here. If, on the other hand, you’re only selecting hair and nothing else, or only selecting smooth edges and nothing else, you’ll probably find that you’re better off leaving Smart Radius disabled. Of course, it’s easy to select it and then decide if
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It doesnt look across the entire image It only looks within...

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