Two competing stimuli the person will reject the info

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-two competing stimuli: the person will reject the info in the contra-lesional field *functionally blind to one side of the space -if you move their attention/attract attention, they will go there, but they concentrate away from contra-lesional space Balint’s Syndrome Results from bilateral (both LH or RH) damage to the parietal lobe SHAPE \* MERGEFORMAT -Patients’ experience of space disappears -Patients can see only one object at the time -They cannot locate the object that they report seeing
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-They cannot report whether it moves towards or away from them Characterized by 3 main symptoms: Simultagnosia: Inability to perceive multiple objects at the same time Optic ataxia: People have problems controlling voluntary motor movements (cannot grab objects in space) Optic apraxia: People have severe problems in voluntary eye movements (cannot move their eyes and land on a target-can’t say “look over here”) *doesn’t have to have all these 3 symptoms **Balint’s Syndrome is debilitating to patients Brain Mechanisms What are the brain mechanisms that are involved in controlling attention? Questions asked: (1) What are functional consequences of attention? -Increases sensory processing of attended stimuli in corresponding sensory processing areas Example: attention to stimulus motion (2) What are neural mechanisms that control those effects? -Depends on the mode of orienting -Two distinct cortical networks are implicated in the control of reflexive and volitional orienting -Subcortical structures like the Superior Collilulus are also implicated -plays a large role in attention SHAPE \* MERGEFORMAT (YELLOW) Reflexive orienting: Ventrolateral frontoparietal network -Comprised of: Temporoparietal junction (TPJ), Middle Frontal Gyrus (MFG), Inferior Frontal Gyrus (IFG) -Largely lateralized to Right Hemisphere (BLUE) Voluntary orienting: Dorsolateral frontoparietal network -Comprised of: Superior Parietal lobe (SPL), Intraparietal sculus (lps), Frontal Eye Field (FEF) -Bilateral Lecture 7 January 27, 2011 Lecture 7 January 27, 2011 MFG
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  • Winter '08
  • LEVITIN
  • Parietal lobe

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