1230 you calmed and supported the patient and the

This preview shows page 4 out of 4 pages.

12:30 You calmed and supported the patient and the family. This is reasonable. 12:40 You phoned the provider in order to discuss the patient. 13:10 Patient status - Heart rate: 87. Pulse: Present. Blood pressure: 137/69 mmHg. Respiration: 12. Conscious state: Appropriate. SpO2: 96%. Temp: 37 C. EFM: --. Fetal heart rate: --. 13:43 You ended the scenario by returning to the nurse's station. A patient with preeclampsia without severe symptoms and with a normal bloodpressure could be discharge from the hospital for follow up. This was reasonable. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy complicate 5%-10% of all pregnancies, with rates as high as 26%-29% in nulliparous women. The symptoms associated with mild preeclampsia are defined as new onset of hypertension after 20 weeks of gestation and proteinuria in pregnancy. Initial treatment for mild preeclampsia includes reduced activity and bed rest, and lifestyle changes to reduce stress. Some may require treatment with oral antihypertensives. Patients need to be educated about warning signs of hypertensive disorders, including changes in vision, headache, abdominal pain, epigastric pain, sudden and increasing nausea and vomiting, bleeding gums, decreased urinary output, and decreased fetal movement. The primary objective for pregnant women with hypertensive disorders is always optimal safety for the mother and fetus. Delivery is considered when it is possible to promote health for both mother and fetus without admission in critical care areas, including neonatal intensive care. If identified early, hypertensive disorders can be e ff ectively managed until optimal circumstances for delivery can be initiated through induction or spontaneous labor. You got 100% " " " " "

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture