Spontaneous false memory In our example of eating hot dogs and drinking milk

Spontaneous false memory in our example of eating hot

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 37 pages.

Spontaneous false memory. In our example of eating hot dogs and drinking milk, suppose that your memory errors were pursuant to recall and recognition probes such as: What did you eat at the game? Did you eat a hot dog at the game? What did you drink at lunch? Did you drink a glass of milk at lunch? Apparently, such errors must be attributable to spontaneous, endogenous dis- tortion processes that are a normal part of how episodic memory operates; that is, they are natural concomitants of trying to remem- ber familiar events that fit with the gist of events that were actually experienced. Over the decades, these spontaneous false memories have been measured with materials as varied as narratives ( Bartlett, 1932 ), This document is copyrighted by the American Psychological Association or one of its allied publishers. This article is intended solely for the personal use of the individual user and is not to be disseminated broadly. 1316 BOOKBINDER AND BRAINERD
Image of page 2
Table 1 Overview of Studies With Effect Sizes Study n Paradigm Population Type of test Groups Mean Comparison Cohen’s d Budson et al. (2006) 58 DRM Younger adults Recognition Negative .37 .08 Neutral .39 Older adults Recognition Negative .49 .11 Neutral .46 Adults with AD Recognition Negative .63 .18 Neutral .68 Howe, Toth, and Cicchetti (2011) 284 DRM Maltx 6–9 yos Recall Negative .17 4.34 Neutral .11 Maltx 10–12 yos Recall Negative .15 10.38 Neutral .10 Non-maltx 6–9 yos Recall Negative .16 4.06 Neutral .11 Non-maltx 10–12 yos Recall Negative .14 10.60 Neutral .10 El Sharkawy et al. (2008) 32 DRM Young adults Recognition Negative 7.88 .67 Neutral 6.56 Howe et al. (2010 ; Exp. 1) 40 DRM Young adults Recognition Negative .67 1.28 Neutral .51 Recall Negative .27 1.44 Neutral .40 Howe et al. (2010 ; Exp. 2) 60 DRM Children Recognition Negative .67 .45 Neutral .59 Recall Negative .23 .73 Neutral .34 Howe et al. (2010 ; Exp. 3) 60 DRM Young adults Delayed recall Negative .20 .95 Neutral .30 Howe et al. (2010 ; Exp. 4) 30 DRM 5 & 8 yos Delayed recall Negative .10 1.82 Neutral .25 Howe et al. (2010 ; Exp. 5) 80 DRM 7 & 11 yos Delayed recall Negative .20 .77 Neutral .31 Dehon et al. (2010 ; Exp 1) 36 DRM Young adults Recognition Negative .42 Neg vs. neu .71 Positive .60 Pos vs. neu .77 Neutral .59 Dehon et al. (2010 ; Exp 2) 54 DRM Young adults Recall Negative .37 Neg vs. neu .70 Positive .39 Pos vs. neu .81 Neutral .19 Gallo, Foster, and Johnson, (2009) 24 Pictures with labels Younger and older adults Recognition Negative .14 Pos vs. neu .82 Positive .18 Neg vs. neu .70 Neutral .09 Pos vs. neg .65 Choi et al. (2013 ; Exp. 2) 48 Pictures with thematic labels Young adults Recognition Negative .25 Neg pos vs. neu 1.41 Positive .30 Neutral .25 Bookbinder & Brainerd (2016) 68 Categorized pictures Young adults Recognition Immediate Immediate test Negative .67 Neg vs. pos 2.35 Positive .61 Pos vs. neu 3.14 Neutral .53 Delay test Neg vs. pos 4.00 Delay Neu vs. pos 3.00 ( table continues ) This document is copyrighted by the American Psychological Association or one of its allied publishers.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 37 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture