Populations there are five extant pneumatopteris

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Populations There are five extant Pneumatopteris pennigera subpopulations in Tasmania, and a further two historic records. All known subpopulations , and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the species in Tasmania. The extant subpopulations support a total of about 350 plants (Table 5). The Copper Creek subpopulation has declined from 2500 to 55–70 plants since the mid 2000s (Larcombe & Garrett 2009), while the more southerly of the three Arthur River stands could not be relocated during TSS surveys in 2005 and 2009 and is presumed to be extinct. The reasons for these declines remain unknown, though drought, hydrological changes and possibly King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 133
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thrip infestations have been suggested as causal factors (Larcombe & Garrett 2009). The Pass River subpopulation on King Island is also close to extinction, supporting only five plants in badly degraded habitat, and is not considered viable (Garrett 1997). King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 134
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Table 5. Population summary for Pneumatopteris pennigera in Tasmania Subpopulatio n Tenure NRM regio n 1:25 000 mapshe et Year last (first) seen Area occupi ed (ha) Number of plants 1 Copper Creek Private Cradl e Coast Lileah 2009 1996 (1948?) 0.5 5–6 55–70 > 2500 2 Arthur River (no rth ) Conservati on Area Cradl e Coast Bluff 2011 (1996) < 1 150–170 3 Sawards Cr ee k (Arthur River) Conservati on Area Cradl e Coast Bluff 2011 (2005) < 0.1 60–70 4 Ettrick River (King Island) Public Reserve Cradl e Coast Pearsha pe 2009 (1966) < 0.1 38 5 Pass River (King Island) Public Reserve Cradl e Coast Loorana 2007 (1960s?) 0.0000 1 5 6 Arthur River (so ut h) Conservati on Area Cradl e Coast Bluff 1996 (1980s) Presume d extinct 7 Mole Creek Private North Mole Creek 1907? (1907?) Presume d extinct Reservation Status Pneumatopteris pennigera is reserved within the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area. The two subpopulations on King Island, Ettrick River and Pass River, are within Public Reserves that have been recommended for Nature Reserve status under the Nature Conservation Act 2002 (CLAC Project Team 2005b). Each reserve proposal included the following caveat: ‘It is recommended that the reserve not be proclaimed until, where there is no practical alternative, any necessary and suitable access points or arrangements, and impact protection measures to allow for stock watering have been identified. This will require on-site inspection.’ The proclamation process also hinges upon the resolution of outstanding financial issues between the Tasmanian Government and the reserves’ future land managers, the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service: as at December 2009 the status quo prevails. Threats and Management The major threats to the Pneumatopteris pennigera subpopulations on King Island are land clearance, dam construction and other hydrological changes, cattle trampling and weed invasion. Climate change and stochastic events also pose a threat to the species.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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