Half men they simple said that they were funny and

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Half Men” they simple said that they were funny, and they didn’t see the two gay characters Carmine and Mitchell as different. This survey was a great example of how our culture has gone from uncomfortable when presented with the idea of homosexuality, vulgar language, and sexual media to unaffected by these controversies. Back in the day my grandparents would have never imagined that today there would be cursing, sex scenes, teenagers dealing with drugs and alcohol, and gay/bicultural marriages televised 6
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for all to see. For most people today, this has become something to just get used to. Change has happened and our culture acts this way in real life, so why shouldn’t networks publicize it? Does is hurt to be confronted with actions we do in our lives through media? Studies have found that what the public sees through media helps shape their perceptions about reality (Manousos, Online). However, when family sitcoms first originated they were shaped around the public. I find this intriguing because not only has the content itself changed, but so did the inspiration. If these studies are true, then it is our evolved culture that has transformed the media and our own decisions determined the outcomes of society and what we are encouraged to watch on television. In turn, what sitcoms have become contribute to what we know about the world we live in and the people that surround us, expanding our general comprehension. One of the quotes that I happened to stumble upon while doing my research was, “whoever controls the media, the images, controls the culture” which was stated by Allen Ginsberg. I believe that this quote is very accurate because our culture has become very connected through media. Media was once an entertainment factor, an information factor, but today has developed into a mandatory component of everyday life. Without our social media, our television, our Internet, we are lost, disconnected, dysfunctional. What we see, type, read, and watch defines our lives. So yes, Ginsberg’s assertion can be considered accurate because it is the media and its images that are in control of our perceptions and while they can’t force us to rethink our morals or values, they can influence the way we view our world. After tracing various television sitcoms throughout the decades, analyzing their evolvement, and discerning culture from personal perspective, I can now address the bottom line: Is this exposure, this equality support from the media good or bad for our culture and mental development and why? Let’s first look at children. Children today are entertained by television more than any other type of media (Kahan, Online). Even while they play with toys or games the television is usually turned on for background noise.
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