So marriage firstly for perpetual friendship ie mutual support Romeo and Juliet

So marriage firstly for perpetual friendship ie

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So marriage firstly for “perpetual friendship” (ie mutual support). Romeo and Juliet develop a reciprocal relationship. Romeo joins with Juliet to construct a much more modern (to an Elizabethan audience) sonnet. Romeo : If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrine, the gentle sin is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. Juliet : Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. Romeo : Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? Juliet : Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. Romeo : O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do: They pray: grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. Juliet : Saints do not move, though grant for prayer’s sake. Romeo : Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. [ He kisses her .] (1.5.92-105) This shows a new discourse of mutual love. Unlike a Petrarchan sonnet where the woman cannot respond or intervene, here we hear Juliet responding to Romeo. This discourse of mutual love does not make Juliet a twenty-first-century teenage lover, but it does make her a more modern woman to the Elizabethan audience.

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