The battalion commander the task force commander and the brigade commander all

The battalion commander the task force commander and

This preview shows page 7 - 10 out of 13 pages.

The battalion commander, the task force commander, and the brigade commander all apparently knew about what had occurred almost immediately afterwards, as did the division commander, MG Samuel W. Koster, and several chaplains attached to the 11th Light Infantry Brigade. None of them did anything about the matter. Attempts by soldiers to report the incident through the chain of command were quashed” (Dunnigan 233). Calley had led his men to kill many, but there was men who were shock that were furious and ones who refuse to do this horrible deed. In addition, the men were threatened in ways that could've cost them their life. As well there were men who knew what had happened but had not said a word, and there was men who tried to speak out the truth but were put quite. This U.S. action that happened had caused thoughts of should we trust the government decisions? The 6
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government says its decisions are for “the greater good for the people” but is hard to see how necessary slaughtering of innocent civilians such as women and children is include “the greater good for the people. After the U.S. had affected parts of Vietnam with planting toxic chemicals, it then had drastic effects on the land and the people. In the book Perspectives on Modern World History The Vietnam War by David Haugen and Susan Musser it talks about the effects of dangerous operations such as Agent Orange. Haugen and Musser states, “President Nixon escalated the chemical warfare even further. Some 1.88 million hectares of farmland was destroyed, and about 900,000 people of south Vietnam were poisoned. Poising by toxic chemicals has had genetic effects on the following generation, sharply increasing the birth rate of abnormal and deformed babies” ( Haugen and Musser 161). In operations such as Agent Orange, toxic chemicals were spread over the land of Vietnam. It was meant as an advantage for the U.S. to dominate in the battlefield of Vietnam. The lands of Vietnam were often jungle, and by planting chemicals it helped to set a clearance for the American military. The after effects, which left many Vietnamese seriously hurt, caused effects that are still around today. As many Vietnamese were physically damaged by the American weapons, they also were given the right treatment. In the article Current Issues The Lawsuit, Craig Etcheson tells how Agent Orange had a huge effect for Vietnam. It is written, “As it stands today, only the US veterans have received any recognition in regard to what they have suffered and the Vietnamese have gotten no acknowledgement for any damage done by the government and chemical companies” (Etcheson 1). There was a lot of things that the Vietnamese went through by the U.S. invasion. However, it is not right for the U.S. to not give any recognition for the Vietnamese people. Americans suffered by the action, but so did Vietnamese. The Vietnamese were not just physically hurt but also emotional hurt, by 7
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not getting any words of comfort of the damage that was put upon them. By America's actions it had caused damage on the Vietnamese with operations such as Agent Orange. Even though
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