Figure 203 in 1892 this independent peoples party

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Figure 20.3: In 1892, this Independent People's Party (Populist) Convention at Columbus, Nebraska nominated Omer Kem for Congress. His election made him the first Congressman living in a sod-house in the prairie. [3] The 1892 Omaha Convention These conditions fueled the fires of agrarian radicalism. In the elections of 1890, candidates with the support of the Farmers’ Alliance moved into the governors’ mansions in Texas, Tennessee, Georgia, and South Carolina, won majorities in eight southern legislatures and Nebraska, and virtually took over Kansas. In Minnesota and South Dakota, Alliance representatives carved out a controlling share of power between Democrats and Republicans. Even Congress welcomed three senators and forty-four representatives that brought the Alliance agenda with them.
Buoyed by this success, the Alliance met in February of 1892 in St. Louis to form the People’s Party, or Populists. Not only did they unite farmers from the West and South, but they also sought the support of industrial workers for a national victory over the Republican and Democratic parties. At their national convention in Omaha, Nebraska in July, Populists selected James B. Weaver, a Union Army general with Civil War fame, as their presidential candidate. Their platform leaned heavily on the work done by the Grange and Farmers’ Alliances and included the national ownerships of railroads as well as telephone and telegraph networks, a sub- treasury plan, the direct election of senators, a graduated income tax, a currency based on silver as well as gold, an eight-hour day for government workers, and restrictions on immigration. African Americans, Women, and Workers in the People’s Party Populists opened doors for unfamiliar alliances and new voices. In the South, a growing number of white farmers were willing to suspend their racial prejudices and see the common cause they shared with black farmers. Between 1892 and 1896—southern Democrats had effectively used to a one-party system since Redemption—Democrats worked hard to suppress Populist votes at the polls, recognizing the threat of farmers’ interracial solidarity. In "The Negro Question in the South" (1892), Tom Watson told a mixed audience that they were “made to hate each other because upon that hatred is rested the keystone of the arch of financial despotism which enslaves us both.”
Why should the colored man always be taught that the white man of his neighborhood hates him, while a Northern man, who taxes every rag on his back, loves him? Why should not my tenant come to regard me as his friend rather than the manufacturer who plunders us both? Why should we perpetuate a policy which drives the black man into the arms of the Northern politician? […] Let us draw the supposed teeth of this fabled dragon by founding our new policy upon justice— upon the simple but profound truth that, if the voice of passion can be hushed, the self interest of both races will drive them to act in concert. […]

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