When numbering and lettering waves some scheme such as the one shown below is

When numbering and lettering waves some scheme such

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progression of market history. When numbering and lettering waves, some scheme such as the one shown below is recommended to differentiate the degrees of waves in the stock market's progression:
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Wave Degree 5s With the Trend 3s Against the Trend Supercycle (I) (II) (III) (IV) (V) (A) (B) (C) Cycle I II III IV V A B C Primary [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [A] [B] [C] Intermediate (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (a) (b) (c) Minor 1 2 3 4 5 A B C Minute i ii iii iv v a b c Minuette 1 2 3 4 5 a b c The above labels preserve most closely Elliott's notations and are traditional, but a list such as that shown below provides a more orderly use of symbols: Grand Supercycle [I] [II] [III] [IV] [V] [A] [B] [C] Supercycle (I) (II) (III) (IV) (V) (A) (B) (C) Cycle I II III IV V A B C Primary I II III IV V A B C Intermediate [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [a] [b] [c] Minor (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (a) (b) (c) Minute 1 2 3 4 5 a b c Minuette 1 2 3 4 5 a b c The most desirable form for a scientist is usually something like 1 1 , 1 2 , 1 3 , 1 4 , 1 5 , etc., with subscripts denoting degree, but it's a nightmare to read such notations on a chart. The above tables provide for rapid visual orientation. Charts may also use color as an effective device for differentiating degree. In Elliott's suggested terminology, the term "Cycle" is used as a name denoting a specific degree of wave and is not intended to imply a cycle in the typical sense. The same is true of the term "Primary," which in the past has been used loosely by Dow Theorists in phrases such as "primary swing" or "primary bull market." The specific terminology is not critical to the identification of relative degrees, and the authors have no argument with amending the terms, although out of habit we have become comfortable with Elliott's nomenclature. The precise identification of wave degree in "current time" application is occasionally one of the difficult aspects of the Wave Principle. Particularly at the start of a new wave, it can be difficult to decide what degree the initial smaller subdivisions are. The main reason for the difficulty is that wave degree is not based upon specific price or time lengths. Waves are dependent upon form , which is a function of both price and time. The degree of a form is determined by its size and position relative to component, adjacent and encompassing waves. This relativity is one of the aspects of the Wave Principle that make real time interpretation an intellectual challenge. Fortunately, the precise degree is usually irrelevant to successful forecasting since it is relative degree that matters most. Another challenging aspect of the Wave Principle is the variability