Climate wetlands in temperate climates experience

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Climate: Wetlands in temperate climates experience warm summers and cold winters. Wetlands in tropical climates may have temperatures as high as 122º F (50º C). Wetlands receive varying amounts of rain. Some wetlands receive as little as 6 inches (15 cm) of rain each year. Typical flora and fauna: Alligators, snakes, turtles, newts and salamanders are among the reptiles and amphibians that live in wetlands. Invertebrates, such as crayfish, shrimp, mosquitoes, snails and dragonflies, also live in wetlands, along with birds including plover, grouse, storks, herons and other waterfowl. Human impacts: Many wetlands, particularly those near cities, have been polluted by human activities. Waterways often carry toxic loads of nutrients, heavy metals, pesticides and contaminants from previous activities that involved sewage plants, chemical factories, refineries and industry. Humans have also damaged or destroyed wetlands by planting invasive alien species around them, draining them by piping the water out to sea, or directing filthy stormwater from cities towards them 12. Freshwaters Location: Fresh water is found in glaciers, lakes, reservoirs, ponds, rivers, streams, wetlands and even groundwater. These freshwater habitats are less than 1% of the world's total surface area yet house 10% of all known animals and up to 40% of all known fish species. Climate: The temperatures range from 65 °F to 75 °F in the summer and 35 °F to 45 °F in the winter. The climate of freshwater biomes is determined by a number of factors including location, season and depth of water. On average, the temperature will decline as the water gets deeper. Typical flora and fauna: Freshwater plants include algae, bulrushes and cattails, and freshwater animals include crayfish, fish and eels. Human impacts: Humans can alter or even destroy freshwater ecosystems through the construction of hydroelectric dams or irrigation projects. Humans also diverting water for irrigation to reduce the available water for the region's wildlife and can alter the natural flow of water through the aquifer.
13. Intertidal Areas Location: The intertidal zone is the area where the ocean meets the land between high and low tides. A tide pool within Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Intertidal zones exist anywhere the ocean meets the land, from steep, rocky ledges to long, sloping sandy beaches and mudflats that can extend for hundreds of meters. Climate: The weather in the intertidal areas can be extreme. The air and water temperature can range from extremely hot to below freezing to moderate. The average range of air temperature is from 75°f to 102°f. The intertidal zone has much more moist weather, because it is located on the coast. Typical flora and fauna: Organisms in this area include anemones, barnacles, brittle stars, chitons, crabs, green algae, isopods, limpets, mussels, sea stars, snails, whelks and some marine vegetation.

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