Embracing gender and ethnic diversity is an ethical imperative as well a

Embracing gender and ethnic diversity is an ethical

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represent them should be diverse, also. Embracing gender and ethnic diversity is an ethical imperative, as well a business one. Healthcare has an obligation to diversify its management because it helps women and minorities further along in their careers, Women are often underrepresented in leadership ranks across society and it is often contributed to the domestic role that women fulfilled for many years before entering the workforce (Sharma & Kaur, 2014). In the past 60 years, the role of woman has changed from the domesticated model to taking top managerial positions in many types of careers across the world. However, women still face barriers that compromise their leadership because they often face the issues of having less experience and receiving far less pay as a result. Some women will also face the glass ceiling; being given opportunities to move up the ladder, but they will never actually reach the top (Sharma & Kaur, 2014). The ceiling is unable to be reached because women have difficulty reaching the senior levels of management. MHS needs to join the trend of healthcare organizations that are foster the advancement of more female executives to terminal roles in management and build a strong network of female leaders to facilitate and familiarize women in the C-suite (Castellucci, 2017). Expanding leadership skills and giving women the opportunity to showcase their talents can be daunting for some organizations, but must be done. There is valuable insight missing from having women as a part of the decision making process.
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5 HCM 502 PORTFOLIO PROJECT One of the greatest functions of a democratic society is to provide equal opportunities for each citizen, no matter their ethnicity or race. While minorities are fairly represented as a whole in the healthcare sector, they hold a small percentage of administration positions. According to data from the American Hospital Association, in 2014, 91 percent of all hospital CEOs were white while, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau data, 62 percent of the population is white (Ibrahim & Sidani, 2014). Although more and more students are obtaining graduate degrees in healthcare administration over the past two decades, there has still been issues attracting and retaining racial and/or ethnic minorities. Minorities also bring something to the healthcare industry that others cannot; an understanding of the different cultures that healthcare serves. By adding minorities to the organization, the organization can understand what investments need to be made for the health of people and how we can deliver it. Strategies MHS has the potential to return to 50% of administration roles being represented by women and/or minorities, but only if innovative changes occur. There needs to be an investment made in healthcare to boost diversity in every facet, especially administration. There are several strategies that must be reworked in order to guarantee results. The recruitment, selection, and retention process must be streamlined and revised to target women and minorities. Once the employees are hired, there will still be other strategies to improve.
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  • Spring '16
  • Management, Health care provider, MHS

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