Wyrd fate lof glory last word of poem digression a

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--wyrdFate--lofGlory (last word of poem)--digression
a temporary departure from the main subject in speech or writingPlot:--how the poem begins (through line 63)Goes through 4 generations of Danish kings until Hrothgar--name of the Danish king whom Beowulf aidsHrothgar--what the name “Heorot” means“heart hall”- Danish building serving multiple purposes; worship, mead hall, housing, etc--Biblical figure from whom Grendel is said to descendCain--the number of “winters” Grendel torments the Danes (line 147)12 winters--Beowulf’s homelandGEATLAND--the number of warriors who accompany to Denmark14--the first Dane to see Beowulf (no name, just a job description)The guard of Scyldings--probable cause of Beowulf’s commitment to a king not his own (no name, just the relevant relationship)the king of the Danes was once gracious enough to intervene and settle a feud that Edgetho had ignited by slaying a member of a rival tribe called the Wulfings. Therefore, Beowulf's actions stem from bonds of blood and bonds of loyalty. Gave refuge to his father--from whom Beowulf learned of the Danish problems (line 411)Sailors--Beowulf’s weapon against GrendelBare hands--who Unferth isA Danish warrior who is jealous of Beowulf, Unferth is unable or unwilling to fight Grendel, thus proving himself inferior to Beowulf.--how Unferth ridicules BeowulfAbout him losing to Brecca in a swim race--Beowulf’s explanation

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