3 how can one relate racism to the practice of

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3. How can one relate racism to the practice of slavery in early American history? Minority groups such as Africans and Native Americans were often enslaved just because of their skin color or because of their culture. In modern times, we do the same thing. Some people might think of Native American culture as odd, or may not like Black people just because of how they look. It's all about prejudice. 4. Why was it usually forbidden to educate slaves? It was forbidden to educate slaves because the white men were afraid that by educating them the slaves would get smarter. If they got smarter they might figure out how to get slaves out of their predicament. So the idea was to keep them stupid basically so they cannot revolt against the white men. the trail of tears
The Cherokee lived in Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. They changed their culture to be more like their white neighbors in a number of ways:
Naming their children after fathers rather than mothers Becoming Christians Using a written language Forming a government with written laws The Cherokee tried to show white settlers that they were good neighbors and good citizens. Cherokee even fought alongside U.S. soldiers in the Indian wars that took place during the War of 1812. When gold was discovered in northern Georgia, things changed. Soon, the Cherokee would be forced from their land entirely. The Treaty of New Echota Some Cherokee feared that if they did not agree to move West, their poor treatment would continue. In 1836, government officials and a small number of Cherokee leaders signed the Treaty of New Echota. The leaders promised to move the Cherokee tribe to Oklahoma within two years. The treaty divided the Cherokee. While some supported the treaty, most, including John Ross, did not want to leave their land. The Cherokee have been forced to leave their homes and gather in northern Georgia and eastern Tennessee. From there, the tribal leaders will organize the tribe into smaller groups and begin the move west. In October, Nunadautsun't — "the trail where we cried" — will begin. Jobs Along the Trail Everyone along the trail had a job. The chief mapped the route and dealt with the army. The hunters supplied meat. The women cooked and cared for the children. The soldiers helped the hunters and guided the groups. Some soldiers were friendly with the Cherokee. Still, all were responsible to the U.S. government. Today the Cherokee Nation continues to have a government-to-government relationship with the United States. Oklahoma Cherokee are American citizens. Their government is separate from the state government, and they have their own police force. The capital city, Tahlequah, has a population of 15,000. The modern Cherokee Nation has 156,000 members.

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