sort of individual difference that determines an ultimate distinction from the

Sort of individual difference that determines an

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sort of individual difference - that determines an ultimate distinctionfrom the bacterial colonies aggregating in biofilmic cities. On the contrary, bacterial colonies and eukaryotic species belong together. Their distinction only points to a symbiotic coexistence of differential degrees of molecular organization. Between bacterial and eukaryotic life there emerges an intensive differentiation of symbiotic processes of evolution. Eukaryotic cells and genetic structures are embedded in bacterial biofilms packed as tightly as urban centers traversed by channels connecting buildings for the circulation of water, nutrients, enzymes, oxygen and recyclable wastes.14In this sense, it is less a question of difference in kind than of an intensive degree of difference between levels of order mutually composing each other. This intensive differentiation between bacterial and eukaryotic architecture has nothing to do with an internal contradiction or conflict in evolution between a less and a more organized and structured matter. The symbiotic cityscape lays out differential tendencies of collective individuation in matter that cannot be explained by the family tree of gradual development from simple unicellular to complex multicellular beings.We argue, therefore, that symbiotic processes open the question of microterrorism onto biofilmic contagion: and the threat of contagion spreading through slimy architectures entails a threat to the immune network of a microbial network of communication. The nucleic immunity confronts its participation in the bacterial biofilms.
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2.3 Bacterial tactics It could be argued that on the level of eukaryotic life, microterror points to the threat that bacterial colonies pose to the immune systems of nucleus-bounded cells: the threat to eukaryotic life of participating in the microbial body. From this standpoint, such a threat coincides with the way bacteria and viruses are able to evade or suppress the nucleic hosts immune response. For example, molecular mimicry is a tactics that bacteria use to mimic the chemical make up of their host, enabling them to hide and multiply inside the cells of the immune system, ultimately relying on the relentlessness of the immune system to act against the body itself (autoimmunity). Bacteria can also attack directly those antibodies that specifically react against them, pre-empting antibodies from retaliating. These pre-emptive tactics of evasion and suppression of immune response rest on the symbiotic interdependence between the invader and the invaded insofar as they both belong to a molecular network. In such an intricate constellation of molecular terror, the threat of contagion exposes the continual mutual production of variation in matter. In this sense, the immune system does not constitute a self-contained individualized mechanism of defense, which protects the eukaryotic multicellular organism from its outsiders, pathogenic bacteria and viruses.15Endosymbiosis forces us to take another stance and engage with the various modes through which the threat
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  • Spring '14
  • DanielKevles
  • Bacteria, bacterial colonies, bacterial communication

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