The Labor Department says it is cracking down on firms that fail to pay interns

The labor department says it is cracking down on

  • Notes
  • sendemailtoknow
  • 51
  • 57% (14) 8 out of 14 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 51 pages.

The Labor Department says it is cracking down on firms that fail to pay interns properly and expanding  efforts to educate companies, colleges and students on the law regarding internships. “If you're a for-profit employer or you want to pursue an internship with a for-profit employer, there aren't  going to be many circumstances where you can have an internship and not be paid and still be in  compliance with the law,” said Nancy J. Leppink, the acting director of the department's wage and hour  division. Note from the author:  The rules discussed in this article are being applied to for-profit firms but not to  government. Many government internships, including those at congressional offices, are unpaid. The  Labor Department is not trying to prohibit this arrangement. Source:   New York Times,  April 2, 2010. Another one of the  Ten Principles of Economics  is that governments can sometimes  improve market outcomes. Indeed, policymakers are led to control prices because they  view the market's outcome as unfair. Price controls are often aimed at helping the  poor. For instance, rent-control laws try to make housing affordable for everyone, and  minimum-wage laws try to help people escape poverty. Yet price controls often hurt those they are trying to help. Rent control may keep rents  low, but it also discourages landlords from maintaining their buildings and makes  housing hard to find. Minimum-wage laws may raise the incomes of some workers,  but they also cause other workers to be unemployed. Helping those in need can be accomplished in ways other than controlling prices. For  instance, the government can make housing more affordable by paying a fraction of  the rent for poor families. Unlike rent control, such rent subsidies do not reduce the  quantity of housing supplied and, therefore, do not lead to housing shortages.  Similarly, wage subsidies raise the living standards of the working poor without  discouraging firms from hiring them. An example of a wage subsidy is the  earned  income tax credit,  a government program that supplements the incomes of low-wage  workers. Although these alternative policies are often better than price controls, they are not  perfect. Rent and wage subsidies cost the government money and, therefore, require  higher taxes. As we see in the next section, taxation has costs of its own.
Image of page 9
Quick Quiz Define  price ceiling  and  price floor  and give an example of each. Which leads to a shortage? Which leads to a surplus?  Why?
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 51 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes