Strategic advice on how the Campaign might impact on the former was provided to

Strategic advice on how the campaign might impact on

This preview shows page 12 - 14 out of 45 pages.

ori and Pacific peoples. Strategic advice on how the Campaign might impact on the former was provided to the Campaign through consultation with a M ā ori Reference Group and a Pacific Advisory Group (Point Research, 2010:8). Rosenberg, in an insightful book ( Join the Club 2011) about the power of the local and community for meaningful social change, writes about the importance of making connections with peers and using this as a resource for changing problem behaviour or offering exciting alternatives. Social marketing campaigns can thus generate the power to transform individuals and communities when substantial commonalities are recognised and brought to bear. 2. Targeting voluntary behaviour Social marketing targets voluntary behaviour and makes attractive certain choices above others, but people are still left with the choice to ‘buy the product’; it is thus about voluntary engagement and behaviour change, punishment and coercion are not part of the design. There are interesting dilemmas and tensions with creating a non-punitive and inspiring campaign for an issue that is a crime. Careful design and implementation are required with consultation with women’s services (Gibbons & Patterson, 2000).
13 As mentioned earlier, an excellent example of a social marketing effort that targeted perpetrators is the Freedom From Fear campaign. It worked with key stakeholders from government, criminal justice and community services, focusing primarily on perpetrators of intimate partner violence, asking them to voluntarily seek help to change their violent ways; if they voluntarily would seek support to change their violent behaviour, the incidence of violence in the homes would be reduced and their women partners and children would feel and be safer; it would also enhance the health and wellbeing of the entire community (Gibbons & Patterson, 2000). The New Zealand originated Action on Family Violence , the It’s not OK Campaign (2010) also targeted perpetrators of intimate partner violence; its key messages focussed on the effects of the violence, the damage caused to family, that behaviour change was possible and that change was in their best interests (Point Research, 2010). In order to reach the point of sustained behavioural change, the ‘product’ offered needs to be communicated and positioned in such a way as to make it more attractive than perpetrators’ current harmful behaviours. In both the aforementioned campaigns, what was offered was service provision: phone help-lines and counselling services. Anonymity was assured and there was no pressure on men to disclose their name; the phone line was not linked to the police so that concern of criminal sanctions, known as the “competition product”, was reduced and hope for change by being better men through counselling programs figured as the ‘promotion product’. Through a feminist lens, the methods employed for such a campaign need to be devised with the safety of women and children as a paramount concern.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture