219 Indeed this very exorbitance of profit shows that the indus try of the

219 indeed this very exorbitance of profit shows that

This preview shows page 87 - 88 out of 269 pages.

219 Indeed, this very exorbitance of profit shows, that the indus- try of the master is paid out of all proportion with that of the slave. To the consumer it makes no difference. One of the productive classes benefits by the depression of the rest; and that would be all, were it not that the vicious system of pro- duction, resulting from this derangement, opposes the intro- duction of a better plan of industry. The slave and the master are both degraded beings, incapable of approximating to the perfection of industry, and, by their contagion, degrading the industry of the free man, who has no slaves at his command. For labour can never be honourable, or even respectable, where it is executed by an inferior caste. The forced and un- natural superiority of the master over the slave, is exhibited in the affectation of lordly indolence and inactivity: and the faculties of mind are debased in an equal degree; the place of intelligence is usurped by violence and brutality. I have been told by travellers of veracity and observation, that they consider all progress in the arts in Brazil and other settlements of America as utterly hopeless, while slavery shall continue to be tolerated. Those states of the North American Union, which have proscribed slavery, are making the largest strides towards national prosperity. The inhabitants of the slave states of Georgia and Carolina raise the best cotton in the world, but cannot work it up. During the last war with En- gland, they were obliged to send it over land to New York to be spun into yarn. The same cotton is sent back at a vast expense to be consumed at the place of its original growth in a manufactured state. 220 This is a just retribution for the tol- eration of a practice, by which one part of mankind is made to labour, and subjected to the severest privation, for the ben- efit of another. Policy is in this point in accordance with hu- manity. 221 It remains yet to be explained, what are the consequences of the commercial intercourse between the colony and the mother country, in regard to production; always taking it for granted, that the colony continues in a state of dependence, for the moment it shakes off the yoke, it has nothing colonial but its origin, and stands in relation to the mother-country, on ex- actly the same footing as any other nation on the globe. The parent state, with a view to secure to the products of its own soil and industry the market of colonial consumption, gener- ally prohibits the colonists from purchasing European com- modities from any one else, which enables her own merchants to sell their goods in the colony for somewhat more than they are currently worth. This is a benefit conferred on the sub- jects of the parent state at the expense of the colonists, who are likewise its subjects. Considering the mother-country and the colony to be integral parts of one and the same state, the profit and loss balance each other; and this restriction is nuga- tory, except inasmuch as it entails the charge of an establish-
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  • Spring '10
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  • Economics, Wealth of nations, ........., United nations charter, editor, M. Say

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