Your thumb and forefinger not by letting your fingers

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your Thumb and Forefinger (not by letting your Fingers flip each Lens into Place). The 100X is also an Oil Immersion Lens (which is why it has the Black Ring). It works properly only when immersed in special Oil. This is the Lens that you’ll probably use more than any other Lens. 7. Binocular Turret This is a Housing containing the Beam-Splitter that shunts half of the Light to each Eyepiece, and the Prisms that direct the Light at a 45° Angle so you don’t have to tilt the entire Microscope for comfortable Viewing. The Binocular Turret can be rotated 360° or even removed. The Binocular Turret is secured in Position by a Silver Screw. You should keep it secured in Position unless you’d prefer a Degree from Fresno State. 8. Binocular Eyepieces Each of the Eyepieces is removable (and you’ll be removing the Right Eyepiece on a regular Basis.) You should see an Eyepiece Reticle through the Left Eyepiece. Be sure that this Left Eyepiece is rotated to its neutral “0” Position before you start using your Microscope. Interocular Distance (L= between the eyes) can be re-set by arcing each Eyepiece apart, just like with Binoculars. _________________________________________ You're using her as bait. “ It was her idea. Don't worry, no harm will come to her. I can sense everything that's going on in that room. Trust me.’ © 2002 LucasFilm Ltd.
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Lab 3 Page 6 Brightfield Alignment (also called Köhler Illumination) 1. Plug the Microscope Power Cord into the Electric Socket. 2. Use the Lamp Rheostat Control to set the Light to a comfortable Level. 3. Check that the 10X Objective -- not the 3.2X Objective -- is clicked into place and double-check that the Condenser Auxiliary Lens is in Position. 4. Mark a "P" on a Slide with a Sharpie and place it on the Stage. We used to use an “X” but it is all too easy to put the Slide on the Stage Upside-Down and this will result in wonky Alignment. If your “P” is Upside-Down you ʼ ll know it. 5. Fully raise the Condenser with the Condenser Focusing Knob. 6. Focus on the “P” with the Fine and Coarse Focus Knobs. 7. Once in focus, use the Mechanical Stage Controls to move the “P” out of the way (by moving it to the Left or Right) but keep the Slide in the Optical Pathway. Before we align the Optical Components below the Stage, we want to be sure all the Optical Components above the Stage are in their normal working Positions. That ʼ s why we focus on the “P”. Once we ʼ ve got the “P” in focus, all Optical Components above the Stage are in Place and we want it out of the Way. 8. Use the Field Diaphragm Control near the “Zeiss” Logo on the Base of the Microscope to partially close down the Field Diaphragm while looking through the Microscope. You’ll see a Polygon (or maybe a fuzzy Circle). 9. Focus this Polygon using the Condenser Focusing Knob.
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