O PERATING S YSTEMS V ERSION 090 WWW OSTEP ORG I NTERLUDE F ILE AND D

O perating s ystems v ersion 090 www ostep org i

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O PERATING S YSTEMS [V ERSION 0.90] WWW . OSTEP . ORG
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I NTERLUDE : F ILE AND D IRECTORIES 5 T IP : U SE STRACE (A ND S IMILAR T OOLS ) The strace tool provides an awesome way to see what programs are up to. By running it, you can trace which system calls a program makes, see the arguments and return codes, and generally get a very good idea of what is going on. The tool also takes some arguments which can be quite useful. For ex- ample, -f follows any fork’d children too; -t reports the time of day at each call; -e trace=open,close,read,write only traces calls to those system calls and ignores all others. There are many more powerful flags — read the man pages and find out how to harness this wonderful tool. Here is an example of using strace to figure out what cat is doing (some calls removed for readability): prompt> strace cat foo ... open("foo", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE) = 3 read(3, "hello\n", 4096) = 6 write(1, "hello\n", 6) = 6 hello read(3, "", 4096) = 0 close(3) = 0 ... prompt> The first thing that cat does is open the file for reading. A couple of things we should note about this; first, that the file is only opened for reading (not writing), as indicated by the O RDONLY flag; second, that the 64-bit offset be used ( O LARGEFILE ); third, that the call to open() succeeds and returns a file descriptor, which has the value of 3. Why does the first call to open() return 3, not 0 or perhaps 1 as you might expect? As it turns out, each running process already has three files open, standard input (which the process can read to receive input), standard output (which the process can write to in order to dump infor- mation to the screen), and standard error (which the process can write error messages to). These are represented by file descriptors 0, 1, and 2, respectively. Thus, when you first open another file (as cat does above), it will almost certainly be file descriptor 3. After the open succeeds, cat uses the read() system call to repeat- edly read some bytes from a file. The first argument to read() is the file descriptor, thus telling the file system which file to read; a process can of course have multiple files open at once, and thus the descriptor enables the operating system to know which file a particular read refers to. The second argument points to a buffer where the result of the read() will be placed; in the system-call trace above, strace shows the results of the read in this spot (“hello”). The third argument is the size of the buffer, which c circlecopyrt 2014, A RPACI -D USSEAU T HREE E ASY P IECES
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6 I NTERLUDE : F ILE AND D IRECTORIES in this case is 4 KB. The call to read() returns successfully as well, here returning the number of bytes it read (6, which includes 5 for the letters in the word “hello” and one for an end-of-line marker). At this point, you see another interesting result of the strace: a single call to the write() system call, to the file descriptor 1. As we mentioned above, this descriptor is known as the standard output, and thus is used to write the word “hello” to the screen as the program cat is meant to do. But does it call write() directly? Maybe (if it is highly optimized).
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