Use of alcohol and innocence and did not support al

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use of alcohol) and innocence, and did not support Al Smith, from New York, because of his Irish ethnicity, who was catholic and who came from the city because this people from the city were liberal, internationalist, was a wet (believed in anti-prohibition, and his connection with Tammany Hall (the New York City Democratic political machine). In addition American people were experiencing great prosperity and were in no mood to break the status quo of Republican rule. Upon his inauguration, Hoover was hailed or cheered as a person who had the experience and expertise to run the government. Four years later, he was rejected by a nation consumed
by economic despair. The Hoover cabinet reflected his conservative philosophy, and cabinet policies won the appreciation of the business community. More than half the men in his cabinet were millionaires, including Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon. The election of 1932.- With the Republican party handicapped by the view that it was responsible for the depression, the Democratic candidate for president, Franklin D. Roosevelt (the New York governor), won the presidency. The result at the polls was an unprecedented majority for the Democrats. The 1932 contest rarely addressed in a constructive way the critical issues of the Great Depression. The vote reflected less a triumph for Roosevelt than a rejection of Hoover. Domestic issues;- In the post-World War I decade were persistent economic problems that Americans were reluctant to face, especially taxation, agriculture and tariffs. Andrew Mellon headed the Treasury Department from 1921 to 1931; he headed 3 Republican administrations of the 1920’s, until the depression hit at the end of the decade. Mellon and the 3 presidents under whom he served won the acclaim of businessman for their efforts to decrease tax rates both on corporations and wealthy individuals. There was political disagreement about this centered in the Midwestern farm block, which insisted that agriculture receive government support equivalent to that conferred upon industry. However, prosperity in non-agricultural sectors -the majority of the population- led to continued support of Republican administrations and the fiscal policies of Mellon. The problem of the relation of agriculture to the industrial city became acute after World War I. Because farmers did not share with businessmen and laborers the great prosperity of the 1920’s, the government decided to take steps to help them. However, the demands for food during World War I brought unprecedented good times to American farmers. The mechanization of agriculture brought increasing profits to farmers. The farmer’s prosperous years were few. Peace brought a quick descent to prewar price levels. From 1919 to 1921, the value of farm products was cut in half. The farmer’s sad situation, they were being threat with foreclosing their mortgages, was the result of overproduction and the decline of agricultural prices in the world market, where the farm surplus of the United States competed with that of other nations.

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