Think pearl harbor and 911 two weeks apart multiply

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Employment Law for Human Resource Practice
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Chapter 16 / Exercise 2
Employment Law for Human Resource Practice
Walsh
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Think Pearl Harbor and 9/11 two weeks apart. Multiply this by a bunch of times, and, by 1860, the people want a solution, dammit. There was a lot of tension and stress about this conflict. People wanted something to happen once and for all. “Let’s get it over with.” Bloodshed is better than all this waiting. This attitude was created in the 1850s. Uncle Tom’s Cabin One of the major 1850s events was the publication of the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1852. This book was a ridiculous best-seller. It sold more than anything other than the Bible. It was really well-sold in England. Uncle Tom is the hero of the book, even though we use it pejoratively today. The point was that even a man as good as Uncle Tom is abused because he’s a slave. Uncle Tom is mistreated in every way possible by the villain slaveowner, since the point was “slavery bad”. This put pictures of slavery in people’s minds, especially in the North. It made people think “slave === Uncle Tom”, “fugitive slave === mother protecting her baby”. It made people sensitive about slavery. You got a whole generation of northerners more sensitive to the evils of slavery (it was banned in the South). Kansas-Nebraska Act After people calmed down a bit from the whole Uncle Tom’s Cabin thing, the Kansas-Nebraska Act happened. The Kansas and Nebraska territories were part of the Louisiana purchase and north of the 36-30 line. In 1854, there was a big push to make a railroad that would go across the continent. The eastern US had railroads, so people just had to link up to those railroads. Senator Douglas, the chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories, was one of the guys that got the Compromise of 1850 through. Douglas argued that the new railroad should go through Chicago because it had the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. Chicago would become a big commercial hub. Douglas wanted Chicago, but a bunch of other Senators weren’t happy with this idea because they wanted their own cities. A lot of the Chicago opposition came from Southern senators, who wanted the railroad to come through the slave states. Eventually, Douglas worked out a deal with some Southern senators. They said they’d go along with Chicago, but they wanted the 36-30 line repealed. Douglas was willing to go with that, since he though that southern slave crops can’t be grown up there, so it doesn’t matter whether there’s a line or not. He thought the repeal was “throwing a bone to a dog”. So, he got the repeal, and Douglas created a bit of a fix to some opposition to his plan. He created two new territories, Kansas and Nebraska, which would both decide on slavery for themselves. Douglas got all his changes passed in 1854. This ticked off a bunch of northerners because they thought of the Kansas-Nebraska area as “theirs”. These northerners were worried that slaveowners 4
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Employment Law for Human Resource Practice
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Chapter 16 / Exercise 2
Employment Law for Human Resource Practice
Walsh
Expert Verified
would take everything over. The northerners didn’t like that they’d be losing control of their own backyard. They didn’t want to compete with slaves for jobs, and a bunch of other stuff. Northerners

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