Conclusion daily cleansing of micu patients with chg

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Conclusion: Daily cleansing of MICU patients with CHG-impregnated cloths is a simple, effective strategy to decrease the rate of primary BSIs. Daily chlorohexidine gluconate bathing with impregnated cloths results in statistically significant reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections. Dixon, J. M., & Carver, R. L. (2010). Daily chlorohexidine gluconate bathing with impregnated cloths results in statistically significant reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections. American Journal of Infection Control, 38 (10), 817-821. Background: Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) contribute to increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and excessive cost of care. Methods: This study was an observational cohort study using historical controls in the setting of a 9-bed surgical intensive care unit in a Level I trauma center; all patients admitted or transferred into the unit were enrolled in the study. Objectives: A quality improvement intervention protocol was instituted to reduce CLABSI incidence with a 3-month effectiveness study using 2% chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths for daily patient bathing; education of surgical intensive care unit staff on changes to CLABSI prevention protocol and all existing CLABSI prevention policies and bundles already in place; and compliance monitoring and documentation. Results: The 3-month effectiveness study showed a decrease in CLABSI rates from 12.07 CLABSIs per 1000 central line-days to 3.17 CLABSIs per 1000 central line-days (73.7% rate reduction; P = .0358).
PICOT STATEMENT AND LITERATURE 7 Conclusion: CLABSI incidence rates were reduced in a high-risk patient population using evidence-based prevention bundles and implementing daily bathing with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate nonrinse cloths. Chlorhexidine Bathing and Health Care-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Noto, M. J., Domenico, H. J., Byrne, D. W., Talbot, T., Rice, T. W., Bernard, G. R., & Wheeler, A. P. (2015). Chlorhexidine Bathing and Health Care-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 313 (4), 369-378. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.18400 Importance: Daily bathing of critically ill patients with the broad-spectrum, topical antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine is widely performed and may reduce health care–associated infections. Objective: To determine if daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of health care–associated infections. Design, Setting, and Participants: A pragmatic cluster randomized, crossover study of 9340 patients admitted to 5 adult intensive care units of a tertiary medical center in Nashville, Tennessee, from July 2012 through July 2013. Interventions: Units performed once-daily bathing of all patients with disposable cloths impregnated with 2% chlorhexidine or nonantimicrobial cloths as a control. Bathing treatments were performed for a 10-week period followed by a 2-week washout period during which patients were bathed with nonantimicrobial disposable cloths, before crossover to the alternate
PICOT STATEMENT AND LITERATURE

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