Commitment 0793 0017 0059 0298 IV Web Usage And On Line Interaction 0023 0210

Commitment 0793 0017 0059 0298 iv web usage and on

This preview shows page 9 - 10 out of 13 pages.

Commitment 0.793 0.017* 0.059 0.298 IV. Web Usage And On Line Interaction 0.023* 0.210 0.307 0.035* V. Course Compliance And Confidence In The System 0.009** 0.000** 0.000** 0.103 VI. Relevance Of Testing Instruments And Grading 0.233 0.003** 0.008** 0.102 Source: Primary Data * Significant at 5% level** Highly Significant at 1% level 9.1 Discussion of results Table 6 gives the analytical results of Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests that compared the key demographic categories and factor dimensions. 9.1.1 Null Hypothesis-1 Ho 1 tested the assumption that there are no significant differences between male and female students (e- learners) with regard to their opinions on the six factors on quality perceptions. Since it is a two sample non- parametric test, Mann-Whitney test considered appropriate, was applied. Null Hypothesis, Ho has been rejected in respect of three out of six factors implying that significant differences have been noticed between male and female e-learners with regard to the ‘Relevance of Course Contents and Delivery’(Factor I - p- value 0.043*), ‘Web-Usage and Online Interaction’(Factor IV - p-value 0.023*), and ‘Course Compliance and Confidence in the System (Factor V p-value 0.009**) related factors. 9.1.2 Null Hypothesis-2 Ho 2 tested the assumption that there are no significant differences between Oman and UAE students with regard to their opinions on the six factors on quality perceptions. Here again, Mann-Whitney was applied. Interestingly, Ho has been rejected in respect of four out of six factors. It means that highly significant differences prevail with regard to Factor I, ‘Relevance of Course Contents and Delivery’(p-value 0.001**), Factor II, Effectiveness of Delivery Mode’ (p-value 0.000**), Factor III, ‘Instructor Support and Students’ Commitment’ (p-value 0.017* significant), Factor V, ‘Course Compliance and Confidence in the System’ (p- value 0.000**) and Factor VI, ‘Relevance of Testing Instruments and Grading’ (p-value 0.003**). 9.1.3 Null Hypothesis-3 Ho 3 assumed that there are no significant differences among Matriculate, Graduate and Post-graduate students with regard to their opinions on the six factors on quality perceptions. Since three variables had to be compared, Kruskal-Wallis H test was applied. Ho has been rejected in four out of six factors on quality perceptions. In other words, highly significant differences have been noticed among the opinions of matriculates, graduates and postgraduates in respect of four factors, and with the result, the Ho has been rejected in the above four variables. Respondents’ opinions significantly differ in respect of Factor I, ‘Relevance of Course Contents and Delivery’ (p-value 0.005**) and Factor II ‘Effectiveness of Delivery Mode’ (p-value 0.000**), Factor V, ‘Course Compliance and Confidence in the System’ (p-value 0.000**) and Factor VI ‘Relevance of Testing Instruments and Grading’(0.008**).
Image of page 9
Image of page 10

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 13 pages?

  • Spring '10
  • Roth
  • United Arab Emirates, Arab World, Journal e-Learning Volume, Electronic Journal e-Learning

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture