An essay that receives full credit will reference at

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An essay that receives full credit will reference at least three course readings (as before, lectures and the introductory sections of the textbook chapters do not count as “readings,” but may be cited to frame your ideas). Use the previously-mentioned parenthetical citation style. You do not need a works cited page. Please do not quote extensively from the readings, but you may reference their ideas or quote briefly from them if you think it advances your argument. You must have an argument (i.e., a thesis statement) in which you answer the bolded questions above in consultation with the practices outlined in the May reading. You must underline your thesis statement and it must be articulated in no more than 2 sentences. While you may reference the Vivian May essay, it will not count toward your 3 readings. “For practice 1, Harriet Jacobs serves as a perfect example. In Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, she explained that slavery is “terrible” for men but “far more terrible for women.” By writing about her lived experience as an enslaved woman, she employed an intersectional analysis and challenged the androcentric narratives of slavery. She indeed challenged “normative modes of knowing” (May, 81) by revealing how sexual abuse meted on enslaved women allowed for unique racialized and gendered forms of oppression and resistance in slavery.” The “shift toward the multiple” suggested by Vivian Mays is critical to the field of Women’s and Gender Studies, as well as to contemporary applications of feminism, because it creates a feminist space that does not exclude other classes, races, genders, or other groups. Intersectional approaches, as outlined in the 9 practices by Vivian May, when applied to feminist theory have been able to shift towards a broader and more appealing
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perspective that is advantageous to larger groups of people. For Practice 1, Audre Lorde discusses very openly how her identity as a member of many minority groups, as a black, lesbian, feminist, mother in “There is no Hierarchy of Oppression” that when she was young, being black was not considered “normal” in society, and that is a very foreign thought to many black people today. This is a result of development and discussion as a result of intersectionality, and clearly shows how intersectionality helps “marginalized groups articulate” (May, 81) their issues in the greater community. Audre Lorde also discusses how the ranking of her oppressions, as ranking a certain oppression as being more disadvantageous than her other oppressions, is a non-intersectional approach as it reinforces the idea that “one aspect” of herself can “benefit from the oppression of any other” aspect of herself.
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