Called modern prejudice or cultural racism modern

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Called “modern prejudice” or “cultural racism” Modern prejudice often appears subtly In our preferences for what is familiar, similar and comfortable In denials of discrimination and in antagonism toward efforts to promote equality As a race sensitivity that leads to exaggerated reactions to isolated minority persons As patronization o Automatic prejudice Greenwald and his colleagues (1998, 2000) 9 in 10 White people took longer to identify pleasant words as good When associated with Black rather than White faces Consciously expressed little or no prejudice Their bias was unconscious and unintended Hugenberg and Bodenhausen (2003) The more strongly people exhibit such implicit prejudice the render they are to perceive anger in Black faces Some people more quickly learn positive associations to neutral stimuli Tend to exhibit little implicit racial bias (Livingston & Drwecki, 2007) Critics note that unconscious associations may only indicate cultural assumptions Perhaps without prejudice which involves negative feelings and action tendencies Some studies find that implicit bias can leak into behavior Can have life or death consequences Shoot experiment (Correll & his co-workers, 2002; Greenwald & his co-workers, 2003) Invited people to press buttons quickly to shoot or not shoot men
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Who suddenly appeared on-screen holding Either a gun or a harmless object Participants (both Blacks and Whites) more often mistakenly shot harmless targets who were Black If we implicitly associate a particular ethnic group with danger Faces from that group will tend to capture our attention Triger arousal (Donders & others, 2008; Dotsch & Wigboldus, 2008; Trawalter & others, 2008) Payne (2001, 2006) and Judd and colleagues (2004) Found that when primed with a Black rather than a White race People think guns They more quickly recognize a gun More often mistake a tool for a gun Even when race does not bias perception May bias reaction (Klauer & Voss, 2008) People require more or less evidence before firing Reverse effect (Eberhardt & colleagues, 2004) Exposing people to weapons makes them pay more attention to faces of African Americans Even makes police officers more likely to judge stereotypical-looking African Americans as criminals Different brain regions are involved in automatic and consciously controlled stereotyping (Correll & others, 2006) Pictures of outgroups that elicit the most disgust Elicit brain activity in areas associated with disgust and avoidance (Harris & Fiske, 2006) Automatic prejudices involve primitive regions of the brain associated with fear Amygdala Controlled processing is more closely associated with the frontal cortex Enables conscious thinking Use different bits of our frontal lobes When thinking about ourselves or groups we identify with vs
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When thinking about people that we perceive as dissimilar to us (Jenkins & others, 2008; Mitchell & others, 2006) - Gender prejudice o
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