PERIODIZATION Periodization is the practice of dividing training into specific

Periodization periodization is the practice of

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PERIODIZATION Periodization is the practice of dividing training into specific cycles, with each cycle targeting a specific physiological adaptation. The topic of periodization by itself could make up a textbook, so what follows is a quick review. There are various approaches to periodization. Classical periodization, which is used for a power sport, typically uses the following sequence of training cycles: 1. Introduction —Low-volume, low-intensity training prepares athletes for the more demanding training to follow. 2. Hypertrophy —High-volume, moderately intense training increases muscle size and muscle endurance. Increasing muscle size is important because of the positive relationship between muscle size and strength. 3. Strength —Moderate-volume, high-intensity training begins to bring strength to a peak because of the relationship between strength and power. 4. Power —Low-volume, high-intensity training shifts the increases in strength to increases in power. 5. In-season —Low-volume, high-intensity training maintains gains in muscle size, strength, and power during the competitive season.
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Designing a Program | 9 Periodization for a power and endurance sport (e.g., soccer) takes a slightly different approach from the classical style. For example, after the power cycle, a power and endurance cycle of high-volume, moderately intense training that focuses on explosiveness to increase power and endurance simultaneously should be added. The in-season cycle maintains muscle size, strength, power, and endurance through low-volume, high- intensity training. 1. Introduction —Low-volume, low-intensity training prepared athletes for the more demanding training to follow. 2. Hypertrophy —High-volume, moderately intense training increases muscle size and muscle endurance. Increasing muscle size is important because of the positive relationship between muscle size and strength. 3. Strength —Moderate-volume, high-intensity training begins bringing strength to a peak because of the relationship between strength and power. 4. Power —Low-volume, high-intensity training shifts the increases in strength to increases in power. 5. Endurance and power —High-volume, moderately intense training with an emphasis on explosiveness to increases power and endurance simultaneously. 6. In-season —Low-volume, high-intensity training maintains the increases in muscle size, strength, power, and endurance during the competitive season. The specific cycles, sequences of cycles, and the length of each cycle vary based on training goals, athlete’s age and training background, physio- logical needs of the athlete, and so on. To achieve specific physiological adaptations in each cycle requires carefully manipulating the following training variables.
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  • Fall '19
  • Barbell, Weight training, Triceps brachii muscle, pectoralis major muscle, Gluteus Maximus

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