1 meat inspection act 1906 2 pure food and drug act

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1. Meat Inspection Act (1906) 2. Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) 3. Elkins Act (1903) 4. Hepburn Act (1903) 5. Northern Securities v. US (1903) 6. Clayton Antitrust Act (1914) 7. 16 th Amendment (1913) 8. 17 th Amendment (1913) 9. Federal Trade Commission (1914) 10. 18 th Amendment (1920) 11. 19 th Amendment (1920) C. Preservationists and conservationists both supported the establishment of national parks while advocating different government responses to the overuse of natural resources. 1. Yellowstone National Park (1872) 2. Yosemite National Park (1890) 3. Forest Reserve Act (1891) 4. John Muir and the Sierra Club (1892) 5. Newlands Reclamation Act (1902) 6. US Forest Service (1905) D. The Progressives were divided over many issues. Some Progressives supported Southern segregation, while others ignored its presence. Some Progressives advocated expanding popular participation in government, while others called for greater reliance on professional and technical experts to make government more efficient. Progressives also disagreed about immigration restriction. 1. W.E.B Dubois and the Niagara Movement (1905) 2. NAACP (1909) 3. Woodrow Wilson’s support for segregation 4. disagreement over the literacy test for immigrants included in the Immigration Act of 1917 5. use of professional city managers 6. “good government” movement III. During the 1930s, policymakers responded to the mass unemployment and social upheavals of the Great Depression by transforming the U.S. into a limited welfare state, redefining the goals and ideas of modern American liberalism. A. Franklin Roosevelt’s New D eal attempted to end the Great Depression by using government power to provide relief to the poor, stimulate recovery, and reform the American economy. 1. Three Rs” 2. FDR’s “First Hundred Days” (1933) 3. “bank holiday” (1933) 4. Agricultural Adjustment Administration (1933) 5. National Industrial Recovery Act (1933)
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3 07 APUSH (27-35) (1890-1945) (Frameworks) 6. Tennessee Valley Authority (1933) 7. Civilian Conservation Corps (1933) 8. Works Progress Administration (1935) 9. Federal Writers’ Project of the WPA 10. Wagner Act and the National Labor Relations Board (1935) 11. Social Security Act (1935) 12. Resettlement Administration (1935) 13. Keynesian deficit spending to “prime the pump” (1937 -1939) 14. Fair Labor Standards Act (1938) B. Radical, union, and populist movements pushed Roosevelt toward more extensive efforts to change the American economic system, while conservatives in Congress and the Supreme Court sought to limit the New Deal’s scope. 1. Huey Long’s “Share Our Wealth” program (1934) 2. Father Coughlin (“Radio Priest”) and the National Union for Social Justice (1934) 3. Schechter Poultry v. US (1935) overturned NIRA 4. US v. Butler (1936) overturned AAA 5. FDR’s failed Supreme Court -packing plan (1937) C. Although the New Deal did not end the Depression, it left a legacy of reforms and regulatory agencies and fostered a long-term political realignment in which many ethnic groups, African Americans, and working- class communities identified with the Democratic Party.
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