The effects of parallelism are numerous but

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such as a preposition or verbal phrase. The effects of parallelism are numerous, but frequently they act as an organizing force to attract the reader’s attention, add emphasis and organization, or simply provide a musical rhythm. “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity....” (Dickens)“Flying is fast, comfortable, and safe.”I read the magazine while Jordan read the newspaper.
AnaphoraA sub-type of parallelism, when the exact repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of successive lines or sentences. Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech“We shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans…” (Churchill)Jesus’s Beatitudes
ParodyA work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of comic effect and/or ridicule. It exploits peculiarities of an author’s expression (propensity to use too many parentheses, certain favorite words, etc.) Well-written parody offers enlightenment about the original, but poorly written parody offers only ineffectual imitation. Usually an audience must grasp literary allusion and understand the work being parodied in order to fully appreciate the nuances of the newer work. Occasionally, however, parodies take on a life of their own and don’t require knowledge of the original. “Young Frankenstein”: spoof on classic monster moviesParody of traditions of King Arthur stories in Monty Python and the Holy Grail
PedanticAn adjective that describes words, phrases, or general tone that is overly scholarly, academic, or bookish (language that might be described as “show-offy”; using big words for the sake of using big words). Tom Buchanan in Great Gatsby tries to use academic referencesWeatherman saying: “The precipitation will accumulate high in the atmosphere, combining with jet streams moving in from the northeasterly that has been hovering over the New England states”Sheldon Cooper in the Big Bang Theory using overly erudite terms
PersonificationA figure of speech in which the author presents or describes concepts, animals, or inanimate objects by endowing them with human attributes or emotions. Personification is used to make these abstractions, animals, or objects appear more vivid to the reader. “The daisies danced in the gentle breeze.”“The popcorn leaped out of the bowl.” The rose petals tickled her nose.
Point of ViewIn literature, the perspective from which a story is told. There are two general divisions of point of view, and many subdivisions within those. (1) first person narrator tells the story with the first person pronoun, “I,” and is a character in the story. This narrator can be the protagonist, a secondary character, or an observing character. (2) third person narrator relates the events with the third person pronouns, “he,” “she,” and “it.”. In addition, be aware that the term point of view carries an additional meaning. When you are asked to

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