Immediately after the attacks of passengers noticed a

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Immediately after the attacks of September 11, 2001, passengers noticed a lot of Changes in airport security. A good example is when airliners instructed their clients to arrive as much as two hours before flights to ensure enough time to go through security checkpoints. While walking through SCP many individuals were randomly selected for additional screenings, including paddings (hand search) of carry-on baggage. After the infamous shoe bombing attempt on December 2001, travelers were asked to remove their shoes for screening along with their carry-on and miscellaneous items in their possession.
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EVOLUTION OF PASSENGERS SCREENING 6 Not long after September 11 2001 the Transportation Security Administration to control of screening at airports in the United States in February 2002. At the beginning of the change process TSA retained private contractors for screening purposes. Within a period of seven months around November 2002 TSA had hired approximately 56,000 permanent employees to fill the ranks of screeners for passengers and baggage all around the country. Besides passenger screenings the TSA developed the Secure Flight Program, a prescreening program that attempts to strike the proper balance between passengers’ rights and their security. Another program, called Registered Traveler, allows frequent flyers to volunteer background information and biometric identifiers, such as fingerprints, in order to facilitate their security screening. This program had a successful trial in 2005, but has yet to be fully implemented ( - security/p11397#p2 ). The Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 Shortly after September 11, 2001 the United States government passed legislation on Aviation and Transportation Security Act, creating the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). ATSA assigned the duties of screening to the TSA which at first was part of the Department of Transportation and in March 1, 2003 The Department of Homeland Security. ATSA tackled some issues that helped make our aviation security more robust, for example: “ Creating the TSA, requiring the federal government takeover of the screening process, reinvigorating the air marshal program, requiring air cargo security be addressed, requiring
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EVOLUTION OF PASSENGERS SCREENING 7 cockpit doors on commercial passenger airliners to be reinforced” (Price, J. C., & Forrest, J. S. (n.d.). Practical aviation security: Predicting and preventing future threats). Aviation Events that influenced changes in Airport Screenings Shoe Bomber, December 2001 In December 22, 2001 a British man called Richard Colvin Reid boarded American Airlines flight 63 in Paris with Miami as its final destination with plastic explosives stuffed inside a cavity in his shoes with the intent to detonate in mid-flight. “Meanwhile, Saturday's narrowly avoided tragedy aboard Flight 63 compelled the Federal Aviation Administration to issue a new order that will enhance security but could further encumber air travel: Airlines and airports now are conducting random inspections of passengers' shoes. Some passengers also had matches and cigarette lighters confiscated Monday.
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  • Fall '15
  • Transportation Security Administration, Airport security, Aircraft hijacking, Practical Aviation Security

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