And climber subculture membership chasing the moment

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and climber subculture membership Chasing the Moment (Robinson) 35 year old climber: “Yeah, trad climbing is more, is about the fear, trad climbing is about overcoming fear, and it’s just about being out there, and hoping you get that thing. I’ve talked to a few people about this, and a lot of people see the same thing, you’re chasing, I think, yeah, it’s probably that you’re chasing one moment all the time. Who was it I was talking to? An interview with somebody and they said the same thing, you’re chasing a moment and you get it maybe two or three times a year, where you’re absolutely on form and you’re just not scared at all, and you’re just flowing, and the whole thing is a joy, and the rest of the time, you’re in that nether world of half, of like, one minute you’re having a great time, next minute you’re shit scared and not enjoying it.” (Robinson, 2004, p. 12) The Positives of Risk Actively seeking opportunities for risk, provides a site for experiences of: Freedom, control, individual expression, self-actualization, personal fulfillment, and transcendance Researchers have shown that many risk sports are predominantly practiced by the middle/upper middle/elite classes, since they possess the economic capital that can be converted into the time and product/services necessary for involvement in these activities. Risk sports, and the socio-psychological benefits thought to derive from them,
also related to the middle/upper middle class habitus, specifically regarding the: (Bourdieu) “Intrinsic long term rewards from physical and psychological self-betterment” However, the middle/upper classes are not the only ones involved in risk sports… Those with less economic capital, are similarly involved in a quest for excitement, through the creative usage and adaptation of their local environments The Quest for Excitement: Parkour/Free Running (Gilchrist and Wheaton) Developed by young residents of a working class Parisian suburb (banlieue) called, Lisses in the 1980s “The art of moving fluidly from one part of the environment to another... ...It shares some characteristics with other urban lifestyle sports like skateboarding, such as ambivalence to man-on-man (sic) formal competition, an emphasis on self-expression and attitudes to risk, which tend to be carefully calculated and managed rather than taken unnecessarily” (p. 112) The Quest for Excitement: Tomb-Stoning Risk, Social Disadvantage, and Control/Identity “The ‘thrill’ derives from the proximity of danger, or even death, and the oppositional status of the act” - Morrissey Theme 5: Cycle Messengers: Work-Based Subcultures Most sporting subcultures are based around activities that take place in the leisure (non-work) time of participants Work --- Life Work --- Non-Work Work --- Leisure Leisure (non-work) time has increasingly become important in defining individual identity This is partly due to the breakdown in traditional forms and tenures of employment (the demise of the “job for life”) Many are now defined by what they do in their non-work (leisure) time, as

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