The ways of thinking acting and the material and

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A shared way of life. The ways of thinking, acting, and the material and nonmaterial objects that together form a people’s way of life ° Example: Sahtuto’ine, Bear Lake People ° One of the largest lakes in the world drinkable water ° Great Bear Lake is not just a lake, but a living thing that is part of culture ° Material culture: objects that a society produces. A tangible item or items. ° Nonmaterial culture: language, customs, ideas, ideologies, religion ° What do you think are some basic elements of American culture? ° Individualism ° Personal Freedom ° Patriotism ° Culture shock: personal disorientation when experiencing an unfamiliar way of life. Inability to read meanings in unfamiliar places or surroundings. ° ° Components of Culture ° Ideologies – a system of ideas and ideals that in some cases operate to justify cultural traits ° Ex: In the south, religious ideas formed to justify chattel slavery (humans as property that could be sold/bought) and then segregation ° Symbol – anything that carries a particular meaning recognized by people who share a culture ° Diamond ring marriage ° Brands on cars
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° The Cross ° Language – a system of symbols that allows people to communicate with one another ° Languages are constantly changing and evolving ° Norms – unwritten rules and expectations by which a society guides the behaviors of its members ° Sanctions – rewards or punishments for abiding by norms, or breaking them, respectively. Can be informal or formal ° Informal sanction would be teacher giving student dirty look after being interrupted ° Formal sanction would be receiving a fine or imprisonment ° Folkways – norms for routine or casual interaction ° Saying excuse me after burping ° Not using cell phone in professional meeting ° Taboos – behaviors that are typically universally condemned. ° Cannibalism – probably the greatest taboo ° Child rape ° Norms vary by gender ° Ways of walking, talking, etc. ° Subculture – cultural patterns set apart from some/all segment’s of society’s population ° Ex: Gay and lesbian community – had their own bars, clubs, bookstores ° Ex: Fundamentalist Christianity ° Sometimes subcultures become co-opted (borrowed) by the dominant culture ° Ex: Music ° Reflects the moods and sensibilities of that particular culture
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° Ex: Country music is largely an outgrowth of bluegrass – derived from Celtic folk music ° Afro-American music: long appropriated by mainstream America ° Jazz, Blues, the Spiritual, Funk, Rap ° Long been counter-cultural, seductive, anti-authoritarian ° Once mainstream culture co-opts a subculture for it’s own purposes, something else tends to replace it within the subculture ° Ex: Detroit’s Motown became a commercial success in the 1960s only to be replaced ° Hip-Hop: emerged as an art-form in New York City in the late 1970s ° Reflective of the moods and sensibilities of the black urban poor and working class ° Sugarhill Gang – American hip hop group ° What causes Cultural Change?
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  • Fall '11
  • ChristinGlodek

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Christopher Reinemann
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