The criticisms raised by sumner servan schreiber and

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The criticisms raised by Sumner, Servan-Schreiber, and Novikov exemplify how even the most powerful, stable country under a democratic form of government is susceptible to weaknesses and hypocrisy in their practice of democratic principles. Nonetheless, no country under a democratic form of government is perfect, for even with all the criticisms of imperialism, yellow journalism, and monopolistic expansion, America remained the paramount showcase for the success of democracy in a modern, industrialized world.
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American Foreign Policy: The Savior, the Restorer, the IMPERIALIST In the twentieth century, American foreign policy took on many different roles, each interdependent of the other. During World War I and World War II, democratic nations around the world called for American assistance in the fight against world domination; American foreign policy assumed the role as the Savior, the Savior of democracy, freedom, and peace. Compared to other countries in Europe and Asia, the US remained unharmed and actually benefited from the destruction of World War II, for America was able to boost her economy out of depression through wartime production. As countries such as Germany, Japan, and France lay crippled and ruined, American foreign policy took on the responsibility of rebuilding these countries through the Marshall Plan and investments in industry; American foreign policy assumed the role as the Restorer, the Restorer of industry and economy. Why did America assume these roles as the Savior and the Restorer? Moreover, in playing these roles, did American foreign policy act in Imperialist ways? These questions can be answered by analyzing the causes and developments of the Cold War in chronological order. All in all, America took on these roles to provide for American self-interest, self-preservation, and economic expansion, and in doing so, America contracted the label as the Imperialist. America the Savior Beginning in 1914, World War I presented the first serious challenge to democracy. As Germany began mobilizing troops throughout Europe, powering through
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neutral countries such as Belgium, America began to take action by sending allies such as England and France war supplies. In 1917, German U-boats sank the Lusitania, a US merchant ship carrying war supplies to Britain. America responded by taking further action and declaring war against Germany. In his war address to congress, Woodrow Wilson asserted that America needed to be the protector of democracy and freedom; he took on the role of the Savior. He states, “Our motive will not be revenge or the victorious assertion of the physical might of the nation, but only the vindication of right, of human right, which we are only a single champion” (Wilson, 8). Hence, Wilson desired to bear the responsibility of protecting humanity by championing human rights, not by seeking retribution against the oppressors. He continues by declaring: The world must be made safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted upon the tested foundations of political liberty.
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